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jkr facts

Favorite magical word?
Quidditch
"I think I've still got the notebook where I kept scribbling it," Rowling said. "For some reason, I definitely wanted it to begin with a Q. So there were a lot of Q words."

Favorite Potter passage?
Chapter 34 in the "Deathly Hallows" when Harry walks into the forest for what he believes will be the last time.
"Definitely the passage that I found hardest to write of all of them in all seven books and the one that made me cry the most is Chapter 34 in this one," Rowling said. "That was partly because of the content and partly because it had been planned for so long and been roughed out for so long. And to write the definitive version felt like a huge climax."

Favorite part of Potter-mania?
"Talking to readers," Rowling said. "I loved the writing. But aside of the writing, it staggers me that so many people have loved (the books) and what's better than that? Nothing's better than that."

Favorite means of transportation?
Trains.
Trains are a running theme in Rowling's life. Her parents met on a train, her father proposed on a train, the idea of Harry Potter came to Rowling on a train and she became engaged to her husband, Neil, on a train.

"It's just more romantic to do the train," Rowling said. "You're physically traveling through countryside. There's just a romance about a train and particularly an old train when you've got the compartments."

Favorite Potter book?
"Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows"
"I just think it is the best book," Rowling said. "There's nothing I would change. And there's not one single one of the previous books I would say that about. I think that (it's) the best written... And that was a great way to go off. It would have been an awful thing to end on a book that I wasn't very happy with."

Creepiest moment in the books?
"I think that what happens in Godric's Hollowis pretty damn creepy in Book Seven," Rowling said. "Harry, in search of information, as ever, he ...ends up in the hands of a very, very elderly witch who he's never met before. He knows to have been once Dumbledore's friend. But she actually died quite a while before he got there. And what's keeping her alive is something inside her, which is a very large snake. And there comes a point where the snake exits the body. And that was pretty creepy."

Biggest pet peeve about the books?
Rowling "hates" spoilers and when people read the last chapter first.

"You kind of want people to reach it in the way you want them to reach it," Rowling said. "Sorry to sound controlling."

Rowling mused that she should have published the last chapter seperately from the last book.

Is Harry Potter based on a real person?
No.

"So don't believe anyone who crawls out of the woodwork to claim to be Harry Potter," Rowling said.

"More than one have claimed to be Harry. It's interesting that no one ever claims to be Hermione, although maybe that's because I'm quite open and I say that Hermione was at least partially based on me when I was younger."

Rowling said she borrowed the name "Potter" from a family she grew up near, but that's all she took.

As for those who claim to be Harry, it's "very infuriating when people do that," she said.

Did Rowling's sister inspire Harry's scar?
Yes, Rowling's sister Di has a scar, but it's not the basis for Harry's famous mark.

Di received her scar -- which is on her eyebrow -- when Rowling threw a battery at her when they were children.

"I thought she would duck, and she didn't duck. She took the hit," Rowling said. "That would be terrible if by permanently maiming my sister I made a fortune. I definitely don't want to make a connection between those two."

What's next for J.K.?
Rowling said she definitely wants to take some time off, but may not be entirely done with Potter.

She said she "think(s) she will" write a Potter encyclopedia and if she does, she's "promising I will give details."

Another novel starring Harry Potter is a different story.

"There will never be another novel with Harry as the main protagonist because I really feel I've closed his story, and I almost feel that the character deserves a rest," Rowling said. "I'm not going to say I would never ever write about the world again because I may be seized by some desire. But I think it's unlikely."

Is the wizarding world based on Scotland?
How much of the wizarding world was inspired by Scotland?

"This is awful to say but hardly any," Rowling said. "There isn't really a direct geographical link at all because I'd mapped out I'd say 90 percent of the wizarding world before I ever came to live here permanently. Even though I have Scottish blood and even though my sister's been living here for years and years, I had never lived in Edinburgh until the end of 1993 by which time huge amounts of the wizarding world were already written. So I've written, I've actually written, Harry Potter across three countries. Of course England and Portugal and Scotland. And I've also written it on holiday. So it's been all over the place. America, I've written in. I wrote parts of this in New York.

Last word was supposed to be scar?
It was widely reported that the last word of the final Harry Potter book was scar and for years Rowling said that was true.

In the eplilogue, Rowling painted Harry standing on the platform of King's Cross, his nearest and dearest surrounding him and "the last line was something like, Only those who he loved could see the lightening scar,'" Rowling said. "It had a kind of ambuiguity. Is the scar still there?"

Rowling changed it because she wanted a more concrete statement that Harry had won; Voldemort had been defeated. The scare was still there, but now it was only a scar.

"I wanted to say it's over. It's done."

Rowling changed the last sentence to, "All was well."

"That felt right," she said.

Did Rowling really know the whole plot at once?
Rowling was on a train from Manchester to London when the idea of Harry Potter popped into her head, and it's been reported that by the time she left the train she had all seven books mapped out in her mind.

"That would be a gross exaggeration," Rowling said. "It's a complicated plot. But I knew quite a lot. But it it was less in terms of plot, more in terms of characters -- the way the magical world would function and the way the school would function -- because... immediately I knew the central location would be Hogwarts."

Killing parents
"I wanted to kill parents," Rowling said, quickly admitting how horrible that sounds.

Throughout the books, the death of James and Lilly Potter is echoed in the deaths of Sirius, Dumbledore and Lupin, all of Harry's father-figures in order to "show the absolute evil of what Voldemort's doing."

The death of Lupin and Tonks in the Battle of Hogwarts serves to create a new orphan, their son Teddy.

"I think one of the most devastating things about war is the children left behind," Rowling said. "As happened in the first war when Harry's left behind, I wanted us to see another child left behind. And it made it very poignant that it was their newborn son."

Politics and Potter
"It is a political metaphor," Rowling said, adding that the books don't speak to one particular political system.

"What interested me was the notion that the wizards have been driven into hiding essentially," Rowling said. "You would hope... they will band together and they will look after each other and that there will be a solidarity. But human nature being what it is, they created their own hierarchy. And they persecuted within their own society."

The Weasleys are the exception to the rule. They were given what the pure bloods value and totally disregard it.

"They value different things and much better things," Rowling said. "They value ingenuity. They value brain power. And they value human goodness."

Regrets about the books?
"There are minor plot things that I would change going back," Rowling said. "I'd certainly edit "Phoenix" a bit better because I think it's too long."

Rowling said "Phoenix" was a "difficult book" because it was the transition and she needed to include information that would play out further down the road.

"(Harry) needed to meet Kreacher. He needed to go to Grimmauld Place. He needed to go to the ministry. He needed to hear the prophecy, etc., etc."

Choice over birth
The theme of choosing your destiny rather than being born into it is weaved throughout almost every aspect of the series, right down to Harry Potter's name.

"I was looking for a name that was really quite mundane in a way, but a name that I liked," Rowling said. "It was making this point of choices making people what they are and not birth. Birth really is a total accident. And we have to create ourselves in life. And that's what Harry does."

A good portion of "Deathly Hallows" is dedicated to exploring the darker parts of Dumbledore's past and his struggle with power.

"This is all about growing up and accepting that we all have the darkness and light inside of us," Rowling said. "Dumbledore knew what his weakness was and he learned it when he was 17. He learned his weakness and his temptation was power... This is, again, about people recognizing their thoughts and changing and wanting to improve and be better people. He recognized that."

By dealing with his demons and choosing to remain at Hogwarts rather than put himself in the way of power at the Ministry of Magic, Rowling says Dumbledore becomes more "loveable and admirable."

Biggest regret in life?
She never told her mom about the books. Rowling's mother died in 1993 after a 10-year battle with MS.

"She never knew," Rowling said. "She would have loved this just in the sense any mother wants to know their child is successful. She would have been at every event I did. She would have had so much vicarious pleasure in seeing who I met and what I did. Not telling her, that's a massive regret."

Religion and Potter
"There clearly is a religious undertone and it's always been difficult to talk about that because until we reached Book Seven, views of what happens after death and so on, it would give away a lot of what was coming," Rowling said. "So yes, my belief and my struggling with religious belief, and so on, I think is quite apparent in this book."

Who got to read the book early?
Rowling's daughter Jessica read "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows" pre-publication

Death and Potter
The death of Rowling's mother in 1993 had a "profound influence" on the theme of death in Harry Potter.

"I really think from that moment on, death became a central if not the central theme of the seven books," Rowling said.

"In many ways, all of my characters are defined by their attitude to death and the possibility of death."

Voldemort, for example, is someone who will do anything not to die. He is terrified of death.

J.K. Rowling a slytherin?
No, Rowling has not joined the House of Salazar Slytherin.

The ring she wore to her interview with Meredith Vieira is a gift from her husband, Neil, and a testament to the fact that she was born in the year of the snake.

It may come as no surprise that Rowling suspects she would be sorted into Gryffindor if she were to attend Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

"The virtue I prize above the others, and I think it's patently obvious from the books, is courage," Rowling said. "So I would hope to be in Gryffindor. Whether I would be judged worthy or not, I don't know."

Killing (and sparing) characters
"I am often asked, 'Well, don't you feel guilty killing people, characters that kids love?' And it sounds horrible and heartless to say 'no.' But the truth is that when you're writing, you have to think only of what you're writing and make a writer's decision about that... You must not sit there and think, 'Well, I was going to kill Hagrid but, you know, people love him.'"

Killing (and sparing) characters
"I am often asked, 'Well, don't you feel guilty killing people, characters that kids love?' And it sounds horrible and heartless to say 'no.' But the truth is that when you're writing, you have to think only of what you're writing and make a writer's decision about that... You must not sit there and think, 'Well, I was going to kill Hagrid but, you know, people love him.'"

Mr. Weasley
"If there's one character I couldn't bear to part with, it's Arthur Weasley," Rowling said.

In her original plan, Mr. Weasley was scheduled to die in Book Five, but when Rowling started writing "Order of the Phoenix," Rowling couldn't bear to follow through. Hence, in "Phoenix," Mr. Weasley survives a snake bite and Rowling killed off two different characters later in the series to make up for the reprieve.

"I think part of the reason for that is there were very few good fathers in the book. In fact, you could make a very good case for Arthur Weasley being the only good father in the whole series."

Rowling admits that just as Dumbledore became attached to Harry, she become too attached to Arthur Weasley. But there is another reason she selected the two additional characters, who had survived in her original vision of the story, to die at the end of "Deathly Hallows."

Fred Weasley
Fred Weasley, one half of the fun-loving twins, was another casualty in the Battle of Hogwarts.

But why Fred and not his brother George?

"I always knew it was going to be Fred, and I couldn't honestly tell you why," Rowling said.

Rowling guessed most people would have expected George to die before Fred because Fred was the ringleader, George the "gentler" twin.

"Fred is normally the funnier, but also the crueler of the two. So they might have thought that George would be the more vulnerable one and, therefore, the one to die."

She didn't make her decision because it was easier to kill one twin over the other, however.

"Either one of them would have been terrible to kill," she said. "It was awful killing Fred. I hated that."


What would you change in the movies?
"There are tiny things that maybe I would have done differently," Rowling said.

"I always think that it's interesting that they've never been able to put Peeves up. And that, quite literally, is the spirit that the books have that can't go into the film. They've never found a great way to do Peeves. And, you know, I think Peeves adds quite a lot to Hogwarts."

Tonks and Lupin
"I wanted there to be an echo of what happened to Harry just to show the absolute evil of what Voldemort's doing," she said.

The theme resonates throughout the books with the deaths of Sirius Black and Albus Dumbledore, Harry's flawed father figures.

That's why in the Battle of Hogwarts, Remus Lupin, Harry's only remaining father figure, and Nymphadora Tonks die, in the process creating another orphan in their son Teddy.

"I think one of the most devastating things about war is the children left behind," Rowling said. "As happened in the first war when Harry's left behind, I wanted us to see another child left behind. And it made it very poignant that it was their newborn son."

Relationship with the actors?
Rowling characterized her relationship with Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson and Rupert Grint as "strange."

"I feel very protective. I feel like a godmother or something... They feel connected to me in a bizarre way because of what they've done. They grew up with these characters that I've created... And then there's a personal relationship because I know them now."

Hagrid
Many fans feared for Hagrid's safety in the run up to "The Deathly Hallows."

Hagrid, actually, had been safe in Rowling's mind from the very beginning. Before her first book, "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone," was even published, Rowling planned for Hagrid to carry Harry out of the forest at the end of "Deathly Hallows," believing that Harry was dead.

"It was very significant," Rowling said. "Hagrid brings Harry from the Dursleys. He takes him into the wizarding world. He was sort of his guardian and his guide. And now I wanted Hagrid to be the one to lead Harry out of the forest."

Hagrid was the one character Rowling's sister, Di, couldn't stand to see die. The last thing Di said to Rowling before opening "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows," was, "If Hagrid dies, I will never forgive you."

"But it wasn't because of her I kept him alive," Rowling said. "I should pretend it was. I might get a better Christmas present."

Did the actors know more than they let on?
Rowling said all the actors knew more than they told the public but she revealed the biggest secret of all to Daniel Radcliffe.

When Rowling and the Radcliffes were out to dinner not too long ago, Rowling told Radcliffe he would get a death scene in the final movie.

"I'm pretty sure he would have walked away from that dinner thinking, 'Yeah, I get a death scene, but what does that mean?'" Rowling said.

Why is Draco owner of the Elder wand?
Voldemort thinks that he becomes the true owner of the Elder Wand by stealing it from Dumbledore's grave, but in the end we learn that the true owner was really Draco Malfoy, that is, until Harry defeated him and allegiance transferred to Harry. How did Draco become the true owner of the Elder Wand?

"To truly own the Elder Wand, which means to receive the full benefits, double-edged though it is, of all its power, you have to have conquered the previous owner," explained Rowling.

At the end of Book Six, "Half-Blood Prince," Draco disarmed Dumbledore before Snape killed Dumbledore.

"And that meant he conquered him, even though Dumbledore was very weak at the time, he was very ill. He was on the point of collapse when it happened," Rowling said. "Dumbledore didn't want to lose his wand at that point and Draco disarmed him. So that meant that the wand gave Draco its allegiance, even though Draco never knew it, even though Draco never touched it.

"From that moment on, that wand gave its allegiance to Draco, and it wouldn't work as well for anyone but Draco."

When Harry wrestles Draco's "everyday" wand out of his hand at the Malfoy's mansion, he conquers Draco, and therefore the Elder Wand hidden in Dumbledore's tomb at the time transfers its allegiance to Harry.

Rowling said her American editor suggested the moment when Harry conquers Draco should be more dramatic.

"But, no, I really wanted, very consciously, for the history of the wizarding world to hinge on this moment where two teenage boys have a physical [fight]. They don't even do it by magic," Rowling said.

"That sort of puts all of Voldemort's and Dumbledore's grandiose plans in their place, doesn't it? You just can't plan that well, that something can go wrong and it went wrong... It went wrong because Harry managed to pull this wand out of Draco's grip."

Harry, Ron and Hermione
In the years since Voldemort's defeat, Harry and Ron have revolutionized the Auror Department at the Ministry of magic and Hermione is "pretty high up" in the Department of Magical Law Enforcement.

By the time of the epilogue when Harry is married to Ginny and has three children, he has risen to head of the Auror Department, but still finds time to go back to Hogwarts to give the odd lecture on Defense against the Dark Arts.

"Harry, Ron and Herimone don't join the same Ministry of Magic they had been at odds with for years; they revolutionize it and the ministry evolves into a "really good place to be."

"They made a new world."

Why 19 years later?
Of all the time in the Harry's life that you could have chosen to set the epilogue, why 19 years later?

"I didn't want some people to have children too young because I don't think that's good," Rowling said. "So 19 years was just enough time for the next generation to have reached the point I wanted them to reach when the Hogwarts Express is departing."

There is no significance to the number, no magical explanation. At the Battle of Hogwarts Ron and Hermione are 18 and Harry is 17, and Rowling said she wanted them to have some peaceful time before they started having children.

"I don't want to encourage teenage pregnancies," Rowling said, laughing. "It couldn't be much earlier than 19."

Luna Lovegood
Luna Lovegood, the eccentric Ravenclaw who was fascinated with Crumple-Horned Snorkacks and Umgubular Slashkilters, continues to march to the beat of her own drum.

"I think that Luna is now traveling the world looking for various mad creatures," Rowling said. "She's a naturalist, whatever the wizarding equivalent of that is."

Luna does recognize the truth about her father, eventually acknowledging there are some creatures that don't exist.

"But I do think that she's so open-minded and just an incredible person that she probably would be uncovering things that no one's ever seen before," Rowling said.

It's possible Luna has also found love with another member of the D.A.

Neville Longbottom
Is it possible Neville ends up with Luna Lovegood?

When she was first asked about the possibility with Luna hooking up with Neville Longbottom several years ago, Rowling's response was "definitely not." But as time passed and she watched her character's mature, she started to "feel a bit of a pull" between the unlikely pair.

Ultimately, Rowling left open the possibility for their relationship open at the end of the book because doing otherwise "felt too neat."

How did Neville get Gryffindor's sword?
In "Deathly Hallows," Griphook the goblin claims that Godric Gryffindor stole his sword from the goblins and Griphook, in turn, steals the sword from Harry, Ron and Hermione in Gringotts. So how does Neville pull the sword from the Sorting Hat during the Battle of Hogwarts?

"Now we can reveal that Griphook was wrong," Rowling said. The sword was truly Gryffindor's and he didn't steal it. Its first allegiance always was to a worthy Gryffindor, and it was going to come back when someone really, really needed it. And it came back to Neville."

Mr. and Mrs. Longbottom
Neville's parents, who were tortured into madness by Bellatrix Lestrange, never leave St. Mungo's Hospital for Magical Maladies.

"I know people really wanted some hope for that, and I can quite see why because, in a way, what happens to Neville's parents is even worse than what happened to Harry's parents," Rowling said. "The damage that is done is, in some cases with very dark magic, is done permanently

Is Snape good or evil?
After seven years at Hogwarts, we finally learn that Severus Snape, albeit somewhat grudgingly, has always been working to protect Harry. But is he really a good person?

"I don't really see him as a hero," Rowling said. "He's not an unequivocally good character. He's a complicated man."

Rowling said Snape is bitter, spiteful and a bully, but he is also immensely brave and capable of love.

"As we know from the epilogue, Harry really sees the good in Snape ultimately... there's redemption," Rowling said. "I wanted there to be redemption and I wanted there to be forgiveness. And Harry forgives, even knowing that till the end Snape loathes him unjustifiably."

James Potter
"I know much more about James than appears in the book," Rowling said. "I think James was a bit spoiled by his parents. He's an only child. He was really adored. He was talented. He was reasonably good looking, not as good looking as Sirius but still not bad."

He had everything Snape didn't have.

"James could certainly have been kinder to this boy who was a bit of an outcast. And he wasn't. And these actions have consequences. And we know what they were."

It was only after James toned down some of his more "bombastic" behavior that he managed to win over Lily.

"I think there was a lot of good in James," Rowling said. "I think that Lily would have been great for James because she wouldn't have put up with any of his rubbish. So I think he would have become a lot less spoiled."

Did Voldemort have to die?
"I suppose we're going to call him a psychopath," Rowling said. "He's beyond redemption. Although this being Harry Potter and because I can take liberties because I have magic in my world, it is shown at the very end of the book that he did have a chance for redemption because he had taken into his body this drop of love."

Voldemort took in this "drop of love" when he used Harry's blood to return to human form at the end of "Goblet of Fire."

"That meant that if could have mastered the courage to repent, he would have been OK," Rowling said. "But, of course he wouldn't. And that's his choice."

Teddy Lupin
In many ways, Rowling said, the epilogue was written just to show that Teddy Lupin was okay, that he is happy, that he has an ongoing relationship with Harry and that he has a very pretty girlfriend, Bill and Fluer's oldest daughter.

"I wanted to show that life went on. And that even where there had been deaths, you know, there would be life, and so on," Rowling said.

Rowling originally wrote a much more detailed epilogue, but decided to trim it down. She said she broke into tears at the thought of cutting Teddy Lupin out of the final draft.

"Obviously, Teddy Lupin's very important to me," Rowling said. "Having killed both his parents, I really wanted him to be okay."

 

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legallyzoya

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legallyzoya

Joined: 27 February 2007

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Posted: 16 January 2008 at 5:42am | IP Logged
thanx a lot
thats a lovely article!

lucky_lakshmi

IF-Sizzlerz

lucky_lakshmi

Joined: 27 February 2005

Posts: 10594

Posted: 16 January 2008 at 6:08am | IP Logged
Originally posted by aromal

Biggest pet peeve about the books?
Rowling "hates" spoilers and when people read the last chapter first.

True... SPOILSPORTS!OuchDead

Another novel starring Harry Potter is a different story.

"There will never be another novel with Harry as the main protagonist because I really feel I've closed his story, and I almost feel that the character deserves a rest," Rowling said. "I'm not going to say I would never ever write about the world again because I may be seized by some desire. But I think it's unlikely."

See Rowling has closed this for once n for all...I hope ppl dun go blabbing abt that HP 8 is round in the corner n all!LOL

The death of Lupin and Tonks in the Battle of Hogwarts serves to create a new orphan, their son Teddy.

"I think one of the most devastating things about war is the children left behind," Rowling said. "As happened in the first war when Harry's left behind, I wanted us to see another child left behind. And it made it very poignant that it was their newborn son."

It was really DEVASTATING!!Poor Remus!!! U cud've spared him at least JO,...For MY sakeLOLEmbarrassed

lucky_lakshmi

IF-Sizzlerz

lucky_lakshmi

Joined: 27 February 2005

Posts: 10594

Posted: 16 January 2008 at 6:17am | IP Logged
Originally posted by aromal

Is Snape good or evil?
After seven years at Hogwarts, we finally learn that Severus Snape, albeit somewhat grudgingly, has always been working to protect Harry. But is he really a good person?

"I don't really see him as a hero," Rowling said. "He's not an unequivocally good character. He's a complicated man."

indeed...he isnt a conventional "hero"--Like character..a true Byronical character who mystifies u so much...n thats what makes him such a remarkably interesting guy!LOLWink

Rowling said Snape is bitter, spiteful and a bully, but he is also immensely brave and capable of love.

*weeps*(well pretends to!)EmbarrassedWink

"As we know from the epilogue, Harry really sees the good in Snape ultimately... there's redemption," Rowling said. "I wanted there to be redemption and I wanted there to be forgiveness. And Harry forgives, even knowing that till the end Snape loathes him unjustifiably."

well unjustifiably is a strong words here too..coz its the same from the other side too...N human heart isnt really 'justifiable' many a time!

But Jo is the writer and will have it her way!WinkLOL

James Potter
"I know much more about James than appears in the book," Rowling said. "I think James was a bit spoiled by his parents. He's an only child. He was really adored. He was talented. He was reasonably good looking, not as good looking as Sirius but still not bad."

Not BAD!WinkLOL

He had everything Snape didn't have.

"James could certainly have been kinder to this boy who was a bit of an outcast. And he wasn't. And these actions have consequences. And we know what they were."

Lolz...really she is leading to PoOr James Death! LOLsee it cums doen to DD's line in OOTP..."We wizards have mistreated and abused out fellows for too long and v r now reaping our reward"

It was only after James toned down some of his more "bombastic" behavior that he managed to win over Lily.

LOLLOLLOL women!LOL

"I think there was a lot of good in James," Rowling said. "I think that Lily would have been great for James because she wouldn't have put up with any of his rubbish. So I think he would have become a lot less spoiled."


True all ppl have a dark and fair sideSmile

(But Sevrus is way better Na Jo?! even though he is really vindicative..He is damn interesting!Wink)

Did Voldemort have to die?
"I suppose we're going to call him a psychopath," Rowling said. "He's beyond redemption.

though I dun really believe any man is beyond redemption..But haha PSYCOPATH!!!LOLLOLLOL WELL said



Thanks a lot for this wonderful article Loved it!Smile

beautywidbrains

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beautywidbrains

Joined: 09 December 2007

Posts: 34

Posted: 18 January 2008 at 12:16am | IP Logged
thanx sooooooooooo muchi was going mad finding the answer to how on earth did neville get the sword...
thanx a ton!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Quirky

IF-Rockerz

Quirky

Joined: 09 April 2007

Posts: 7818

Posted: 18 January 2008 at 4:33am | IP Logged
wow amazin article..thnx!!

chhilt

IF-Rockerz

chhilt

Joined: 07 January 2008

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Posted: 18 January 2008 at 3:12pm | IP Logged
thanks a million... you're the best!!!

madu1006

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madu1006

Joined: 02 August 2007

Posts: 574

Posted: 18 January 2008 at 3:15pm | IP Logged
wow thanx i would never no this

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