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Jia

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Posted: 21 July 2007 at 10:03pm | IP Logged
Originally posted by mythili_Kiran

Dear Muggle friends!!Tongue olaa, i consider myself a witch...i appear and disappear from DM in a sec or well a postWinkLOL just saw this topic and it seemed the most interesting one since i am a HP fan...so here are my views ...

You all might have read atleast one harry potter series book or atleast you might have seen atleast one harry potter movie!!! seen them and read them all :)

What do you think of these Harry Potter literature and movies?? they are awesome - thats not much of a description, but really they take you away into this imaginary world where everything ultimately comes down to reality - to love and friendship. i believe the books make us realise yet again, in a very long way, that against all odds love and friendship will win the fight (i have yet to read book 7, but im sure that it wont end in a sad way and hatred and power won't win)

Do they make any sense ?? or Do they really take you another wonderful world?? as i said, yes they do. the descriptions of each and every object seen makes everything come to live when you read the book. slowly and gradually so many more tricks so many objects are introduced that it really keeps you glued to the book. the twists the turns the little regular "love" and relationships as seen b/w regular teenagers...everything is there.

Do you think that Harry Potter books really ignited the interest in book reading in children?? no not really. as a kid i was most interested in reading Nancy Drew...haha i think i read all of the books in ND series. i came to know about HP only after book 2 was long out and book 3 was going to be out soon. after that i was hooked to the book...i think any book that is interesting and that has an imaginary world will interest any child. not just children, something that intrigues u and is out of the ordinary is good enough for us to further delve into.

Or

Do you think it creates some mania in the people who read and see those Harry potter stuff??(Once my student said she likes to have owl as pet becoz harry's pet is owl andinterestingly she has'nt seen a single Indian owl,she thought all owls are so pretty as Harry's owls)?? anything that you like and adore, you would want to be like it more. (wow i rhymedLOL) if i like the clothes a particular tv artist wears, i would want those. if paris hilton has that cute dog, i want one too (thats an example, i would never want to copy her...). basically its the general idea of a fan following, its nothing new.

Don't you think un necessary hype is created for harry potter stuff???? advertising is always done to create this hype. harry potter books got successful, so many other industries started gaining from this success. toys, childrens books, a theme park (in 2009!!) and of course movies. movies in turn promote their actors. so, just one success of this book lead to so many more people earning out of it. the hype is not unnecessary, fans of HP love this hype. those who don't might see it as unnecessary, but every little bit of new info that we get, we enjoy it and keep wanting more. hype is created to keep this fanship alive, to keep everyone on the edge to want to know more...and they are successful at this technique.

BTW who is your fav character in Harry Potter series an why? Im not sure actually. there are so many that i love but i think i have soft spot for Ron. He is a loyal and caring friend, his way of always ending up in trouble, his red head weasley background (which adds a lot to his persona), he is extremely funny and has that cute goofy look on his face (in movies) that i am really fond of. 

Is there any other equivalent to Harry Potter stuff in your language (just like Jataka Tales)?? english is my language for reading books. i don't read and never have read hindi books (unless it was a hindi text book that i was reqd to read in school). lord of the rings is another kind of such series, but im not a fan of that one.

Wishes,

Myth

nice topic Mythili!! Completely the apt time to discuss HP. :)

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IdeaQueen

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Posted: 22 July 2007 at 9:51am | IP Logged
Originally posted by sweet_kp

Originally posted by mythili_Kiran

Dear Muggle friends!!Tongue olaa, i consider myself a witch...i appear and disappear from DM in a sec or well a postWinkLOL just saw this topic and it seemed the most interesting one since i am a HP fan...so here are my views

You all might have read atleast one harry potter series book or atleast you might have seen atleast one harry potter movie!!! seen them and read them all :)

What do you think of these Harry Potter literature and movies?? they are awesome - thats not much of a description, but really they take you away into this imaginary world where everything ultimately comes down to reality - to love and friendship. i believe the books make us realise yet again, in a very long way, that against all odds love and friendship will win the fight (i have yet to read book 7, but im sure that it wont end in a sad way and hatred and power won't win)

Do they make any sense ?? or Do they really take you another wonderful world?? as i said, yes they do. the descriptions of each and every object seen makes everything come to live when you read the book. slowly and gradually so many more tricks so many objects are introduced that it really keeps you glued to the book. the twists the turns the little regular "love" and relationships as seen b/w regular teenagers...everything is there.

Do you think that Harry Potter books really ignited the interest in book reading in children?? no not really. as a kid i was most interested in reading Nancy Drew...haha i think i read all of the books in ND series. i came to know about HP only after book 2 was long out and book 3 was going to be out soon. after that i was hooked to the book...i think any book that is interesting and that has an imaginary world will interest any child. not just children, something that intrigues u and is out of the ordinary is good enough for us to further delve into.

Or

Do you think it creates some mania in the people who read and see those Harry potter stuff??(Once my student said she likes to have owl as pet becoz harry's pet is owl andinterestingly she has'nt seen a single Indian owl,she thought all owls are so pretty as Harry's owls)?? anything that you like and adore, you would want to be like it more. (wow i rhymedLOL) if i like the clothes a particular tv artist wears, i would want those. if paris hilton has that cute dog, i want one too (thats an example, i would never want to copy her...). basically its the general idea of a fan following, its nothing new.

Don't you think un necessary hype is created for harry potter stuff???? advertising is always done to create this hype. harry potter books got successful, so many other industries started gaining from this success. toys, childrens books, a theme park (in 2009!!) and of course movies. movies in turn promote their actors. so, just one success of this book lead to so many more people earning out of it. the hype is not unnecessary, fans of HP love this hype. those who don't might see it as unnecessary, but every little bit of new info that we get, we enjoy it and keep wanting more. hype is created to keep this fanship alive, to keep everyone on the edge to want to know more...and they are successful at this technique.

BTW who is your fav character in Harry Potter series an why? Im not sure actually. there are so many that i love but i think i have soft spot for Ron. He is a loyal and caring friend, his way of always ending up in trouble, his red head weasley background (which adds a lot to his persona), he is extremely funny and has that cute goofy look on his face (in movies) that i am really fond of. 

Is there any other equivalent to Harry Potter stuff in your language (just like Jataka Tales)?? english is my language for reading books. i don't read and never have read hindi books (unless it was a hindi text book that i was reqd to read in school). lord of the rings is another kind of such series, but im not a fan of that one.

Wishes,

Myth

nice topic Mythili!! Completely the apt time to discuss HP. :)

Thanks for the detailed reply Sweet _Kp Smile!!!Nice points to justify your love towards HP books! Tongue

IdeaQueen

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Posted: 22 July 2007 at 9:53am | IP Logged
Potter mania SAMANTH SUBRAMANIAN
What is truly disturbing about J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series is not that it happens to appeal so much to children but that it happens to appeal so much to adults.

This is perhaps J.K. Rowling's biggest achievement: to write a series that has unashamedly and exclusively targeted children, and to then watch it explode, partly by word of mouth, into a phenomenon that has consumed adults as well.


Photos: AP and Royal Mail via Bloomberg News

Over-estimation: Is Harry Potter a marketing marvel?

The curious thing about Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is that, despite its status as arguably the most awaited book in history, it will do next to nothing to determine the place of the Harry Potter series in literary repute. That debate has, over 10 years of Potterphilia, already burned itself down to the ground, scorching a strip of No Man's Land through the reading public and dividing it into two staunchly opposing camps. The merits of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows are unlikely to send loyalists of either side scurrying into the other.

Entertaining debate

That the debate itself has been as, and frequently more, entertaining than the books is an acknowledgement of the age in which we live. These are times when writers of children's fiction do not necessarily write just for children. They must write also for the adult reviewers of literature, and for the adult readers of those reviews, since it is those adult readers who can then set down an adult credit card to buy the book in the first place. The children figure only as inevitable recipients, and sometimes not even then.

So the permanent wryness of Terry Pratchett, the various allegories of Philip Pullman, and the mordant darkness of Lemony Snicket are hardly kid magnets of the first water. They're strategic elements that will induce reviewers to marvel at the realism or the subtlety of the fiction, and to conclude that these books are just as fascinating for grown-ups as for children. This is perhaps J.K. Rowling's biggest achievement to write a series that has unashamedly and exclusively targeted children, and to then watch it explode, partly by word of mouth, into a phenomenon that has consumed adults as well.

*

I read the first three Harry Potter books standing up, in snatches of stolen reading, hidden away behind a pillar when I should have been helping re-stock the shelves in a bookstore. It was the slow winter of 1999, and Harry Potter and t he Prisoner of Azkaban had released just a few months earlier. The franchise hadn't quite reached its apogee of manic frenzy, although it was methodically, assuredly working its way up there. At the time, I remember thinking that they were pleasant enough reads but little more; in my mind, I equated them with the Clive Cussler novel I had just finished, and I moved behind the next pillar to begin Michael Crichton's Timeline.

Less than a year later, the debate went on Full Heat. Rowling's supporters argued that the books had electrified children into reading, and that anybody who managed that stupendous feat deserved the encouragement of every right-thinking individual. That theory has been somewhat bruised by a 2007 study, which found that rather than reading more of everything, children were simply reading more of Harry Potter not quite the universal electrification the literati were looking for.

But even earlier, there were more thundering criticisms. A.S. Byatt called Rowling's universe "a secondary secondary world," tiresomely derivative, and charged that our modern tendency to substitute "celebrity for heroism" fed the Potter phenomenon. Harold Bloom, Yale's ever-caustic literary academic, called Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone severely clich-ridden and compared it very unfavourably to the literatu re of Stephen King.

Even more dramatically, Bloom dismissed the trumpets of the Potter-inspired reading revolution. "Why read, if what you read will not enrich mind or spirit or personality?" he wrote, in a column in The Wall Street Journal in July 2000. Later in the same column, he concluded: "Can more than 35 million book buyers, and their offspring, be wrong? Yes, they have been, and will continue to be for as long as they persevere with Potter."

Anthony Holden, The Observer's literary critic, joined the proponents of another commonly held view that Harry Potter did so well simply because he was marketed to within an inch of his life, with "advance hype w orthy of a Wonderbra." Serving on the jury of the Whitbread Awards for children's fiction, Holden dismissively ignored two fellow judges who insisted that their children enjoyed Potter. "Were their children, I snorted, to be allowed to choose the Book of the Year?" he wrote. "'You should be reading them Beowulf,' I snapped testily. 'It's much the same sort of stuff, heroes taking on dragons and all that, but the language is far mor e exciting'." It was shortly after this, not surprisingly, that he was labelled a "pompous prat" on television.

*

Holden's views and they are not exclusively his on children's literature seem to tell of a titanic shift, from a golden pre-Rowling age of merry Beowulf-reading into the bleak present of hyper-marketed Po tterness. But any of us who aren't quite that out of touch with reality could tell Holden otherwise. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, I was reading the Hardy Boys, Archie comics, and far more Enid Blyton than is considered healthy for a growing child all closer to Harry Potter than Beowulf.

Children's books

Indeed, when were children ever reading Beowulf at that age, short of encountering it in a school curriculum or being Seamus Heaney's grandchildren? Blyton wrote her stories for children midway through the 20th century, and pe nny shockers like the Hardy Boys mysteries appeared even earlier. Roald Dahl's fiction was more sophisticated, but it is hardly Beowulf. Where, then, is Holden's golden age, if children have been reading simplistic, heavily entertaining, lowbrow fiction for many decades now?


Even if some of us were aberrations, and if most of our peers were really crouching under their sheets at night with a flashlight and a dog-eared copy of Beowulf, it doesn't seem to have precluded an escalation to more mature literature. Holden would possibly argue that those were different times, and that distractions like cable television and Facebook will mire today's children at the Potter level of literary thought forever. But Rowling and her publishers invented neither cable television nor Facebook; those are symptoms of a larger social rearrangement that Potter can scarcely be held responsible for.

What is truly disturbing about the Harry Potter series is not that it happens to appeal so much to children but that it happens to appeal so much to adults. As bluntly as ever, Holden advised these adults to "get a life". "Getting in touch with your inner child is all very well," he wrote, "but reluctance to put away childish things is, as another bestseller long ago suggested, rather more worrisome."


Holden's view that the Harry Potter books hold desperately little of value to engage mature thinking is becoming increasingly difficult to share without being accused of joyless literary snobbery. I plead the opposite: That as an adult, it is in fact joyless to read a book that talks down to you, a book where you can lazily read every fourth sentence and sufficiently keep up, a book written in English that is uninspired at its best and awful at its worst, a book that contains no thought or meaning beyond what is iterated at tiresome length on the page. These are conceivably requisite elements for successful children's fiction, and it is unreasonable to grudge their presence in the Harry Potter canon, but that is all that can be said for them.

Adult fascination

It isn't immediately obvious what to make of this adult fascination with Potter. Should we be far more worried now about the standards of adult fiction? Should we surmise that our leading novelists are struggling to make any sort of real connection with their readers? Should we shrug this too away and ascribe it, as we do so much else, to the side effects of the modern world, its incessant stresses that make people want an undemanding, thoughtless experience whenever they do find the energy to pick up a book? Or are we as guilty as Holden of fondly imagining a previous golden age where none existed, and is Harry Potter just the newest instance in a long history of populist reading?

There is, finally, the danger that we over-estimate Harry Potter entirely too much, for he is more a mercantile phenomenon than a literary phenomenon. His legacy, years from now, will be stated in terms of the number of books sold, each copy a tiny Horcrux that contains a multi-millionth part of his soul; it will be stated in terms of how Bloomsbury's stock went up, how much richer Rowling became, how many billions of dollars the movies made. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows will certainly stack those numbers higher, like a teetering pile of poker chips. But numbers come and go, and faster today than ever before; literary longevity, much more lasting and correspondingly elusive, may require a completely different sort of magic altogether.

http://www.hindu.com/mag/2007/07/22/stories/2007072250010100 .htm

season915

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Posted: 24 July 2007 at 11:42am | IP Logged

Originally posted by Gauri_3

hey, my daughter received the book 7 this morning!!! she is busy reading right now LOL

How old is she Gauri(Ji)? Is she liking it so far? And I think that once she is done, you should start reading the HP series as well! Approve



Edited by rutumodi915 - 24 July 2007 at 11:55am

season915

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Posted: 24 July 2007 at 11:53am | IP Logged
Originally posted by rutumodi915

Originally posted by T.

Originally posted by rutumodi915


Aww Myth, I share your sentiments Ouch
But you gotta admit, Dobby is adorable Embarrassed. If I was in Hogwarts, I would definitely join S.P.E.W (Not spew as Harry and Ron think it is Angry)

What about Kreacher? Tongue

Us namakul ka naam mat lo Angry. I hate Kreacher, about the same as Draco, Lucius, Bellatrix and all those jacka$$es. Angry

Dobby is a wonderful house-elf though and I very much think that Kreacher should take lessons from Dobby Approve

I just had to post once again about Kreacher. I take my words back and after reading HP&DH, I very proudly say that Kreacher is an absolute darling and I am very happy with the way his character shaped up in the end!

So, a hug from me to Kreacher! Hug

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Posted: 24 July 2007 at 3:53pm | IP Logged
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Morgoth

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Posted: 25 July 2007 at 3:46am | IP Logged
Originally posted by mythili_Kiran

Potter mania SAMANTH SUBRAMANIAN
What is truly disturbing about J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series is not that it happens to appeal so much to children but that it happens to appeal so much to adults.

Commenting on this particular article:

JKR does not claim to be an adult author, neither does she claim to be a literary author or win Booker Prizes! There is no debate on that at all.

Why adults like her? Well quite simple really - most adults don't necessarily understand Salman Rushdie's novels, but they understand JKR's novels!

Critics are going to hate her the way they hated Sidney Sheldon. Who cares? She earns more than all of these critics anyway!

Popular authors are not always the best "literary" authors.



Edited by T. - 25 July 2007 at 3:46am

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Beyond_the_Veil

Morgoth

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Posted: 25 July 2007 at 3:48am | IP Logged
Originally posted by rutumodi915

Originally posted by rutumodi915

Originally posted by T.

Originally posted by rutumodi915


Aww Myth, I share your sentiments Ouch
But you gotta admit, Dobby is adorable Embarrassed. If I was in Hogwarts, I would definitely join S.P.E.W (Not spew as Harry and Ron think it is Angry)

What about Kreacher? Tongue

Us namakul ka naam mat lo Angry. I hate Kreacher, about the same as Draco, Lucius, Bellatrix and all those jacka$$es. Angry

Dobby is a wonderful house-elf though and I very much think that Kreacher should take lessons from Dobby Approve

I just had to post once again about Kreacher. I take my words back and after reading HP&DH, I very proudly say that Kreacher is an absolute darling and I am very happy with the way his character shaped up in the end!

So, a hug from me to Kreacher! Hug

I had a feeling it might happen when Dumbledore asked the trio to be kind to Kreacher. Tongue

The following 1 member(s) liked the above post:

Beyond_the_Veil

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