Book Talk
Book Talk

India-Forums

   

Book Club discussion of Kite Runner (Page 2)

sareeta IF-Sizzlerz
sareeta
sareeta

Joined: 14 August 2006
Posts: 11542

Posted: 17 February 2007 at 5:42am | IP Logged
Jus grabbed my copy today and started reading it..and intend it finish it in one read... will get back here soon to join the discussion! Smile
Anastacia IF-Veteran Member
Anastacia
Anastacia

Joined: 12 July 2005
Posts: 9108

Posted: 19 February 2007 at 9:02am | IP Logged
OMG so sorry, but I won't be able to participate in this discussion. My book come on hold, but couldn't retrieve it due to lack of time. Will read this over the summer though.
Neelam08 Newbie
Neelam08
Neelam08

Joined: 13 February 2007
Posts: 29

Posted: 21 February 2007 at 1:54pm | IP Logged
hey i read the book last year and i liked it so much i bought it...if you guys haven't read it, don't read further please...i don't want to spoil it for you guys...but if you have, proceed...lol



what i loved about the book was the smoothness with which it was written...so many of the lines in the book stimulated thought that i would have never thought of before...its such an awesome depiction of some of the things that have happened in Afghanistan...one of my favorite scenes in the book is in Chapter 6...pages 54-55

"Would I ever lie to you, Amir agha?"

Suddenly, I decided to toy with him a little. "I don't know. Would you?"

"I'd sooner eat dirt," he said with a look of indignation.

"Really, you'd do that?"

He threw me a puzzled look. "Do what?"

"Eat dirt if I told you to," I said. I knew I was being cruel like when I'd taunt him if he didn't know some big word. But there was something fascinating- albeit in a sick way- about teasing Hassan.

His eyes searched my face for a long time.

"If you asked, I would," he finally said, looking right at me. I dropped my eyes. To this day, I find it hard to gaze directly at people like Hassan, people who mean every word they say.

"But I wonder," he added. "Would you ever ask me to do such a thing, Amir agha?" And just like that, he had thrown at me his own little test. If I was going to toy with him and challenge his loyalty, then he'd toy with me, test my integrity. I wished I hadn't started this conversation. I forced a smile. "Don't be stupid Hassan. You know I wouldn't."

Hassan returned the smile. Except his didn't look forced. "I know," he said. And that's the thing about people who mean everything they say. They think everyone else does too.


how awesome was this scene? i loved Hassan's character. he was so pure by heart. however, i loved Amir's character too. i admit that in the beginning what he did was horrible, watching his then 'servant' be raped by that beast Assef. however, every step he takes is so realistic. we all aspire to be Hassan but we are in many ways like Amir.

all in all, it's a great book and the symbolism is fascinating.
Morgoth IF-Veteran Member
Morgoth
Morgoth

--
Joined: 01 June 2004
Posts: 6832

Posted: 22 February 2007 at 7:28am | IP Logged

Originally posted by Neelam08


"Would I ever lie to you, Amir agha?"

Suddenly, I decided to toy with him a little. "I don't know. Would you?"

"I'd sooner eat dirt," he said with a look of indignation.

"Really, you'd do that?"

He threw me a puzzled look. "Do what?"

"Eat dirt if I told you to," I said. I knew I was being cruel like when I'd taunt him if he didn't know some big word. But there was something fascinating- albeit in a sick way- about teasing Hassan.

His eyes searched my face for a long time.

"If you asked, I would," he finally said, looking right at me. I dropped my eyes. To this day, I find it hard to gaze directly at people like Hassan, people who mean every word they say.

"But I wonder," he added. "Would you ever ask me to do such a thing, Amir agha?" And just like that, he had thrown at me his own little test. If I was going to toy with him and challenge his loyalty, then he'd toy with me, test my integrity. I wished I hadn't started this conversation. I forced a smile. "Don't be stupid Hassan. You know I wouldn't."

Hassan returned the smile. Except his didn't look forced. "I know," he said. And that's the thing about people who mean everything they say. They think everyone else does too. 

I agree. This was a well written scene. But, maybe Amir interpreted Hassan's smile wrongly. Perhaps Hassan already knew about his thoughts, but loved him all the same and accepted his apology.

kirtib IF-Veteran Member
kirtib
kirtib

Joined: 21 February 2006
Posts: 615

Posted: 23 February 2007 at 1:57am | IP Logged
Well I read this book sometime ago and I have to admit it was excellent book..

Amir was always a weak character and he knew that. Just coz he was Pashtun he knew he had to act storng but deep know he very well knew that he doesnt hv courage to stand up if any wrong has been done.

On the other hand Hassan was synonymous to loyalty, courage. He could go any extent to do things for his master.

I think the most weak character was Amir's dad. Amir atleast knew about his shortcomings but his dad showed that he is true Pashtun in every sense. He portrayed an image of a man of integrity. But what kind of man he is if he is ashamed of fathering a Hazara child. If he can go to an extent of sleepin with a low caste woman then accept it. The man who do things that are against the society should also have a courage to accept the wrongdoings.
Pensive Goldie
Pensive
Pensive

Joined: 06 August 2005
Posts: 1573

Posted: 27 February 2007 at 8:21am | IP Logged

Originally posted by T.

IF YOU HAVE NOT READ THE BOOK, DO NOT PROCEED FURTHER. I INTEND TO DISCUSS IT THOROUGHLY AND WILL MAKE REFERENCES TO MAJOR SPOILERS AND KEY PLOT POINTS.




What I loved about this book was the simplicity in the author's narration.

The most powerful metaphor was likening Hassan to a lamb being slaughtered.

However, what angered me the most (apart from that bCensored sodomist Assef, who I would have liked to chop up and feed to the hounds), was Amir's character in the beginning! Angry

I know that while it was lack of courage which prevented Amir from saving Hassan from being raped, he did not stop him from leaving! He completely alienated him when Hassan needed him the most!

Then Baba! What kind of a man would let his Hazara son to go away from him when he loved him more than his Pashtun son?

This comes back to the issue of divides in society and the kind of prejudices which arise in it. Isn't it a HUMAN flaw to be unwilling to challenge and stand up to injustice?

Yes, Amir and Baba pissed me off. Amir because he treated his best friend (half-brother) like dirt out of jealousy and Baba for having the libido to father a child, but not have the gumption to stop him from leaving because of his Hazara heritage.

But, maybe I was angry because they represented what a lot of us are like today. We refuse to stand up to injustice and prejudice and fight against them.

Very nicely put....but Amir was a child himself. So I'm in two minds about Amir's guilt.At what age are we held accountable? Had Amir bravely stepped forward to interfere- could he really have prevented the attack on Hassan anyway?I dont think so ....though I know on the other hand, if the situation were reversed Hassan would have stood up to him, and Amir know this because he did in the past.

But what Amir did later by setting Hassan up was awful .... unforgiveable perhaps. I think he knew exactly what he was doing, he knew it was bad and he knew why it was bad. But at the same time he was still quite young I think the test here is would the adult Amir ever do anything like this, and I think the answer is no. So although Amir was old enough to understand his own actions and their consequences he was not mature enough to enforce his own moral code .. a code which he later showed he did have by returning to Afghanistan and ultimately adopting Hassan's son. At the end Amir is the better man for the mistakes of his childhood



Edited by angel_wings - 27 February 2007 at 9:54am
Pensive Goldie
Pensive
Pensive

Joined: 06 August 2005
Posts: 1573

Posted: 27 February 2007 at 10:09am | IP Logged

Originally posted by kirtib



I think the most weak character was Amir's dad. Amir atleast knew about his shortcomings but his dad showed that he is true Pashtun in every sense. He portrayed an image of a man of integrity. But what kind of man he is if he is ashamed of fathering a Hazara child. If he can go to an extent of sleepin with a low caste woman then accept it. The man who do things that are against the society should also have a courage to accept the wrongdoings.

I agree!!and also Baba's tells Amir that lying is a form of stealing, but we find out later, he himself was guilty of that very sin (lying as theft)and he was probably warning Amir not to make the same mistake that he regretted.Confused However, that's just what Amir does: Amir lies, thus committing the sin Baba warned him against.

Morgoth IF-Veteran Member
Morgoth
Morgoth

--
Joined: 01 June 2004
Posts: 6832

Posted: 27 February 2007 at 4:30pm | IP Logged
Originally posted by angel_wings

Very nicely put....but Amir was a child himself. So I'm in two minds about Amir's guilt.At what age are we held accountable? Had Amir bravely stepped forward to interfere- could he really have prevented the attack on Hassan anyway?I dont think so ....though I know on the other hand, if the situation were reversed Hassan would have stood up to him, and Amir know this because he did in the past.

No, I am not holding him responsible for not saving Hassan at that stage. He was naturally afraid and did not really understand what was going on.

Originally posted by

But what Amir did later by setting Hassan up was awful .... unforgiveable perhaps. I think he knew exactly what he was doing, he knew it was bad and he knew why it was bad. But at the same time he was still quite young I think the test here is would the adult Amir ever do anything like this, and I think the answer is no. So although Amir was old enough to understand his own actions and their consequences he was not mature enough to enforce his own moral code .. a code which he later showed he did have by returning to Afghanistan and ultimately adopting Hassan's son. At the end Amir is the better man for the mistakes of his childhood

I agree.

Go to top

Related Topics

  Topics Author Replies Views Last Post
Recommend - A - BOOK!

2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 46 47

Author: datspreets   Replies: 374   Views: 61353

datspreets 374 61353 29 December 2012 at 4:24pm by B428
Over-rated book which turned out trashy?

2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 17 18

Author: datspreets   Replies: 141   Views: 16676

datspreets 141 16676 23 January 2011 at 2:14pm by koolchick
The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

2

Author: Beyond_the_Veil   Replies: 12   Views: 2236

Beyond_the_Veil 12 2236 11 January 2010 at 3:22pm by baz786
The Kite Runner by Khalid Hosseni

2

Author: shrutichopra   Replies: 13   Views: 1107

shrutichopra 13 1107 31 August 2007 at 1:55pm by ELAS101
Book Club (Currently reading Kite Runner)

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Author: Jia   Replies: 60   Views: 4687

Jia 60 4687 24 February 2007 at 4:40am by diyafah

Forum Quick Jump

Forum Category / Channels
Forums

Book Talk Topic Index

Disclaimer: All Logos and Pictures of various Channels, Shows, Artistes, Media Houses, Companies, Brands etc. belong to their respective owners, and are used to merely visually identify the Channels, Shows, Companies, Brands, etc. to the viewer. Incase of any issue please contact the webmaster.

Popular Channels :
Star Plus | Zee TV | Sony TV | Colors TV | SAB TV | Life OK

Quick Links :
Top 100 TV Celebrities | Top 100 Bollywood Celebs | About Us | Contact Us | Advertise | Forum Index