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~hiP hOp+ RnB~ F/t 2pac p.10 =D

Celina7 IF-Rockerz
Celina7
Celina7

Joined: 04 March 2006
Posts: 5744

Posted: 15 December 2006 at 1:23pm | IP Logged

Hey all Hug

As most of u listen 2 hip hop n/or RnB music so I thought we should have a separate 1 for itEmbarrassed

So here u can dizcuzz da latest n da greatest songz/artistz of hip hop, soul, r&b, rap... etc... Big smile

herez sum info ... SOURCE: WWW.WIKIPEDIA.COM

Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. It consists of two main components: rapping (MCing) and DJing (production and scratching). Along with hip hop dance (notably breakdancing) and urban inspired art, or notably graffiti, these compose the four elements of hip hop, a cultural movement that was initiated by inner-city youth, mostly African Americans[1] in New York City, in the early 1970s.

Typically, hip hop music consists of intensely rhythmic lyrical form making abundant use of techniques like assonance, alliteration, and rhyme. The rapper is accompanied by an instrumental track, usually referred to as a "beat", performed by a DJ, created by a producer, or one or more instrumentalists. This beat is often created using a sample of the percussion break of another song, usually a funk or soul recording. In addition to the beat other sounds are often sampled, synthesized, or performed. Sometimes a track can be instrumental, as a showcase of the skills of the DJ or producer.

Hip hop began in The Bronx, located in New York City, when DJs began isolating the percussion break from funk and disco songs. The early role of the MC was to introduce the DJ and the music and to keep the audience excited. MCs began by speaking between songs, giving exhortations to dance, greetings to audience members, jokes and anecdotes. Eventually this practice became more stylized and became known as rapping. By 1979 hip hop had become a commercially popular music genre and began to enter the American mainstream. In the 1990s, a form of hip hop called gangsta rap became a major part of American music, causing significant controversy over lyrics which were perceived as promoting violence, terrorism , promiscuity, drug use and misogyny. Nevertheless, by the beginning of the 2000s, hip hop was a staple of popular music charts and was being performed in many styles across the world.

History

Nass seminal debut, Illmatic, had a profound impact on East Coast hip hop during the mid-1990s
Enlarge
Nas's seminal debut, Illmatic, had a profound impact on East Coast hip hop during the mid-1990s

The main historical eras of hip hop are the old school hip hop era (1970 to 1985), which spanned from the beginning of hip hop until its emergence into the mainstream, and the golden age hip hop era (1985 to 1993), which consolidated the sounds of the East Coast and the West Coast and transitioned into the modern era with the rise of gangsta rap and G-funk, created by the West Coast. The years after 1993 contain the hardcore hip hop, bling, and underground genres, which largely define the modern era.

Hip hop arose during the 1970s at block parties in New York City, at which the DJs began isolating the percussion breaks to hit funk, soul, R&B and disco songs. The roots of this type of songs stem back to the mid-1950s when soul/funk rock artist James Brown credit Little Richard's band as having been the first to put the funk in the rock beat. These songs were based on C "breakbeat" DJing. As hip hop became popular, performers began speaking while the music played, and became known as MCs or emcees. In 1979, the first commercially issued hip hop recordings were released: "Rapper's Delight" by The Sugarhill Gang which became a Top 40 hit on the U.S. Billboard pop singles chart. 'Rapper' in reference to music was actually coined by this song. Some historians cite King Tim III (Personality Jock) by the Fatback Band to be the first commercially released hip hop recording but they were a funk and disco group.

During the 1980s, hip hop began to diversify and develop into a more complex form. At the same time, more sophisticated techniques were developed, including scratching, and electronic recording. In the late 1980s, a number of new hip hop styles and subgenres began appearing as the genre gained popularity. Hip hop musicians collaborated with rock bands and spread out into the genres of conscious hip hop, jazz-rap and gangsta rap.

In the 1990s, a prolonged confrontation between West Coast gangsta rappers and the resurging East Coast began. It centered around Tupac Shakur and The Notorious B.I.G. and led to both of their deaths, in 1996 and 1997 respectively. In 1996, Cleveland-based rap group Bone Thugs-N-Harmony tied The Beatles' 32-year-old record for fastest-rising single with "Tha Crossroads," and in 2000, Scottish-American White rapper Eminem's The Marshall Mathers LP sold over nine million copies and won a Grammy Award.

Social impact

Hip hop music is a part of hip hop, a cultural movement that includes the activities of breakdancing and graffiti art, as well as associated slang, fashion and other elements. The popularity of music has helped to popularize hip hop culture, both in the United States and to a lesser degree abroad.

The late 1990s saw the rise in popularity of the "bling bling" lifestyle in rap music, focusing on symbols of wealth and status like money, jewelry, cars, and clothing. Although references to wealth have existed since the birth of hip hop, the new, intensified "bling bling" culture has its immediate roots in the enormously commercially successful late-to-mid nineties work (specifically, music videos) of Puff Daddy and Bad Boy Records as well as Master P's No Limit Records. However, the term was coined in 1999 (see 1999 in music) by Cash Money Records artist Lil' Wayne on B.G.'s hit single Bling Bling, and the Cash Money roster were perhaps the epitome of the "bling bling" lifestyle and attitude. Though many rappers, mostly gangsta rappers, unapologetically pursue and celebrate bling bling, others, mostly artists outside of the hip hop mainstream, have expressly criticized the idealized pursuit of bling bling as being materialistic.

All Eyez on Me 1996 was a highly influential album for the genre and is one of the most successful rap albums
Enlarge
All Eyez on Me (1996) was a highly influential album for the genre and is one of the most successful rap albums

The widespread success of hip hop D specifically gangsta rap D has also had a significant social impact on the demeanor of modern youth. The sometimes egotistic attitudes often portrayed in the lyrics and videos of certain hip hop artists have repeatedly shown negative effects on some of their idolizing fans. While the attitudes of specific artists certainly do not represent the rest of the hip hop community, and the effect of lyrical content on youths who are part of the hip hop culture is debatable, very often such youths adopt the much glamorized "gangsta" persona while not being members of any gang. Often these personas incite anti-social behavior such as peer harassment, neglect towards education, rejection of authority, and petty crimes such as vandalism. While the majority of listeners are able to distinguish entertainment from lessons in social conduct, an evident pseudo-gangsta sub-culture has risen amongst North American youth.

Because hip hop music almost always puts an emphasis on hyper-masculinity, its lyrics have been said to reflect a homophobic mindset. It is often suspected that there are a great number of gay or lesbian hip hop musicians who do not come out of the closet, for fear of the decline of their career. Rumors of such have involved hip hop artists such as Queen Latifah, Da Brat, and several others. In 2001, the first annual PeaceOUT World Homo Hop Festival, which features performers by openly lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered rappers was held in Oakland, California, and the festival, curated by artist/activist Juba Kalamka, has continued on an annual basis since then. In 2003 the openly gay hip hop and rap artist Caushun, was rumored to have signed to the Baby Phat imprint (a project of Kimora Lee Simmons,at the time married to hip hop mogul Russell Simmons); however, his record was apparently never released. In September 2005, the documentary Pick Up the Mic premiered at the 30th Annual Toronto International Film Festival, focusing on LGBT hip hop performers, such as Kalamka's group Deep Dickollective,JenRO,Tori Fixx and the duo God-Des and She.

Hip hop has a distinctive slang, that includes words like yo, flow and phat. Due to hip hop's extraordinary commercial success in the late nineties and early 21st century, many of these words have been assimilated into many different dialects across America and the world and even to non-hip hop fans (the word dis for example is remarkably prolific). There are also words like homie which predate hip hop but are often associated with it. Sometimes, terms like what the dilly, yo are popularized by a single song (in this case, "Put Your Hands Where My Eyes Could See" by Busta Rhymes) and are only used briefly. Of special importance is the rule-based slang of Snoop Dogg and E-40, who add -izz to the middle of words so that shit becomes shizznit (the addition of the n occurs occasionally as well). This practice, with origins in Frankie Smith's non-sensical language from his 1980 single "Double Dutch Bus," has spread to even non-hip hop fans, who may be unaware of its derivation.

Censorship issues

Hip hop has probably encountered more problems with censorship than any other form of popular music in recent years, due to the use of expletives. It also receives flak for being anti-establishment, and many of its songs depict wars and coup d' etats that in the end overthrows the government. For example, Public Enemy's "Gotta Give the Peeps What They Need" song was edited without their permission, removing the words "free Mumia".[3] The pervasive use of profanity in many songs has created challenges in the broadcast of such material both on television stations such as MTV, in music video form, and on radio. As a result, many hip hop recordings are broadcast in censored form, with offending language blanked out of the soundtrack (though usually leaving the backing music intact), or even replaced with completely different lyrics. The result C which quite often renders the remaining lyrics unintelligible or contradictory to the original recording C has become almost as widely identified with the genre as any other aspect of the music, and has been parodied in films such as Austin Powers in Goldmember, in which a character C performing in a parody of a hip hop music video C performs an entire verse that is blanked out.

The hip-hop culture started in the mid-1970s amongst young African American people. The culture swept the black community like a wind storm. Rap music became the way of expression and speech. Young hip-hop artist started to express their emotions and frustrations through song, music and dance. This new way of communication for young blacks became so popular that it changed the way people think, act, dressed, and communicated. Rappers were able to tell the stories of the struggles that black families faced on a day to day basis. Rap music became known on a national and international level.

The first popular rap artist consisted of Fab 5 Freddy, D.J. Cool Herc, D.J. Grandmaster Flash, Russel Simmons, and a slew of other artists. Rap artists in the 1970s made music that everyone could dance to. In the 1980s is when rap music changed to touch on issues of poverty, which most of these artists faced in their own communities. These artists helped to open doors for not just other artists but for black people to communicate and be heard. The music is just one aspect of what came out of this new culture, but being shown a new way of life was the biggest impact of all in the black community.

The hip-hop culture has tapped into youth activist organizations to promote the shift in politics. With the help from rap artists, encouraging young people to vote, enhancing the knowledge of HIV/Aids. Artist also encourage young people to finish their education and to become successful. As the hip-hop culture evolved, hip-hop artists helped create a national infrastructure.

Rap music has become a voice that has touched all people; young and old, black and white, Mexican and Asian, in rich and poor communities. What once started out as a black cultures has now become a revolution.

R&B

Rhythm and blues (aka R&B or RnB) is a popular music genre combining jazz, gospel, and blues influences first performed by African American artists.

The term was coined as a musical marketing term in the United States in 1947 by Jerry Wexler at Billboard magazine.[1] It replaced the term race music (which originally came from within the black community, but was deemed offensive in the more positive postwar world,[1]), and the Billboard category Harlem Hit Parade in June 1949. The term was initially used to identify the rocking style of music that combined the 12 bar blues format and boogie-woogie with a back beat, which later became a fundamental element of rock and roll. In 1948, RCA Victor was marketing black music under the name Blues and Rhythm. The words were reversed by Wexler of Atlantic Records, the most aggressive and dominant label in the R&B field in the early years.

In Rock & Roll: An Unruly History (1995) Robert Palmer defines "rhythm and blues" as a catchall rubric used to refer to any music that was made by and for black Americans. In his 1981 book Deep Blues Palmer used "r&b" as a synonym for jump blues. Lawrence Cohn, author of Nothing but the Blues, writes that rhythm and blues was an umbrella term invented for industry convenience, which embraced all black music except classical music and religious music, unless a gospel song sold enough to break into the charts.

By the 1970s, rhythm and blues was being used as a blanket term to describe soul and funk. Today the acronym R&B is almost always used instead of the full rhythm and blues, and mainstream use of the term refers to a modern version of soul and funk-influenced pop music that originated as disco became less favorable.

Original rhythm and blues

Original rhythm and blues
Stylistic origins: Jazz, blues, and gospel
Cultural origins: 1940s United States
Typical instruments: Guitar - Bass - Saxophone - Drum kit - Keyboard
Mainstream popularity: Significant from 1940s to 1960s
Derivative forms: Rock and Roll - Soul music - Funk
Subgenres
Doo wop

In its first manifestation, rhythm and blues was one of the predecessors to rock and roll. It was strongly influenced by jazz, jump blues and black gospel music. It also influenced jazz in return; rhythm and blues, blues, and gospel combined with bebop to create hard bop. The first rock and roll hits consisted of rhythm and blues songs like "Rocket 88" and "Shake, Rattle and Roll", which appeared on popular music charts as well as R&B charts. "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin On", the first hit by Jerry Lee Lewis, was an R&B cover song that reached number one on the pop, R&B and country and western charts.

Musicians paid little attention to the distinctions between jazz and rhythm and blues, and frequently recorded both genres. Numerous swing bands (e.g., Jay McShann's, Tiny Bradshaw's, and Johnny Otis's) also recorded rhythm and blues. Count Basie had a weekly live rhythm and blues broadcast from Harlem. Even a bebop icon, Tadd Dameron, arranged music for Bull Moose Jackson and spent two years as Jackson's pianist after establishing himself in bebop. Most of the R&B studio musicians were jazz musicians, and many of the musicians on Charlie Mingus' breakthrough jazz recordings were R&B veterans. Lionel Hampton's big band of the early 1940s which produced the classic recording Flying Home (tenor sax solo by Illinois Jacquet) was the breeding ground for many of the bebop legends of the 1950s. Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson was a one-man fusion; a bebop saxophonist and a blues shouter.

The 1950s was the premier decade for classic rhythm and blues. Overlapping with other genres such as jazz and rock and roll, R&B developed regional variations. A strong, distinct style straddling the border with blues came out of New Orleans, and was based on a rolling piano style first made famous by Professor Longhair. In the late 1950s, Fats Domino hit the national charts with "Blueberry Hill" and "Ain't That a Shame". Other artists who popularized this Louisiana flavor of R&B included Clarence "Frogman" Henry, Frankie Ford, Irma Thomas, The Neville Brothers and Dr. John.

At the start of their careers in the 1960s, British rock bands like The Rolling Stones, The Yardbirds and the Spencer Davis Group were essentially R&B bands.

Contemporary R&B

Contemporary R&B
Stylistic origins: Funk, soul music, and pop music
Cultural origins: Early 1980s US
Typical instruments: synthesizers - Keyboard - Drum machine
Mainstream popularity: Moderate since 1980s around the world, especially in recent years in the United States
Subgenres
Quiet Storm
Fusion genres
New Jack Swing - Hip-hop soul - Neo soul - 2Step
Other topics
Musicians

It was not until the 1980s that the term R&B regained ordinary usage. During that time, the soul music of James Brown and Sly & the Family Stone had adapted elements from psychedelic rock and other styles through the work of performers like George Clinton. Funk also became a major part of disco, a kind of dance pop electronic music. By the early 1980s, however, funk and soul had become sultry and sexually charged with the work of Prince and others. At that time, the modern style of contemporary R&B came to be a major part of American popular music.

R&B today defines a style of African-American music, originating after the demise of disco in 1980, that combines elements of soul music, funk music, pop music, and (after 1986) hip hop in the form known as contemporary R&B. In this context only the abbreviation "R&B" is used, not the full expression.

Sometimes referred to as "urban contemporary" (the name of the radio format that plays hip hop and R&B music) or "urban pop", contemporary R&B is distinguished by a slick, electronic record production style, drum machine-backed rhythms, and a smooth, lush style of vocal arrangement. Uses of hip hop-inspired beats are typical, although the roughness and grit inherent in hip hop are usually reduced and smoothed out.

[edit] History

Contemporary R&B singer Mary J. Blige performs on the National Mall during the NFL Kickoff Live 2003 Concert.
Enlarge
Contemporary R&B singer Mary J. Blige performs on the National Mall during the NFL Kickoff Live 2003 Concert.

With the transition from soul to R&B in the early to mid 1980s, solo singer Luther Vandross and new stars like Prince (Purple Rain) and Michael Jackson (Off the Wall, Thriller) took over, and dominated the primary schools throughout the 1980s. Jackson's Thriller, which repopularized black music with pop audiences after a post-disco backlash among United States mainstream audiences, is the best-selling album of all time worldwide.

Female R&B singers like Whitney Houston and Janet Jackson, Michael Jackson's sister, gained great popularity during the last half of the decade, and Tina Turner (in her fifties) came back with a series of hits with crossover appeal. Also popular was New Edition, a group of teenagers who served as the prototype for later boy bands such as the New Kids on the Block, the Backstreet Boys, and others.

In 1986, Teddy Riley began producing R&B recordings that included influences from the increasingly popular genre of hip hop music. This combination of R&B style and hip-hop rhythms was termed new jack swing, and artists such as Keith Sweat, Guy, Jodeci, and BellBivDeVoe (featuring former members of New Edition). Another popular, but short-lived group, with more pronounced R&B roots was Levert, whose lead singer, Gerald Levert, was the son of O'Jays lead vocalist Eddie Levert.

In the early 1990s, new jack swing R&B group Boyz II Men repopularized classic-soul inspired vocal harmony, and several similar groups (among them Shai, Soul for Real, and Dru Hill) would follow in their footsteps. Boyz II Men, and several of their competitors, benefited from lush ballads from producers such as Babyface and Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis, who brought Janet Jackson to fame during the late 1980s and early 1990s. As a solo artist, Babyface and contemporaries such as Brian McKnight eschewed prominent hip hop influences, and recorded in a smooth, soft style of R&B termed quiet storm.

In the early 1990s, alternative rock, adult contemporary, and gangsta rap ruled the charts, and R&B artists began adding even more of a rap/hip hop sound to their work. New jack swing had its synthesizer-heavy rhythm tracks replaced by grittier East Coast hip hop-inspired backing tracks, resulting in a genre labeled hip hop soul by Sean "Puffy" Combs, producer for Mary J. Blige. Blige and other hip hop soul artists such as R. Kelly, Montell Jordan, Brandy, and Aaliyah, more than their slicker new jack swing predecessors, brought hip hop slang, style, and attitudes to R&B music. The subgenre also includes a heavy gospel influence with vocal inflections and sounds. The style became less popular by the end of the 1990s, but later experienced a resurgence.

During the mid-1990s, highly successful artists such as Mariah Carey, girl group TLC and the aforementioned Boyz II Men brought contemporary R&B to the mainstream. Boyz II Men and Mariah Carey recorded several Billboard Hot 100 number-one hits, including "One Sweet Day", a collaboration between both acts which became the longest-running number-one hit in Hot 100 history. In addition, both Boyz II Men and TLC released albums in 1994, II and CrazySexyCool, respectively, that sold over ten million copies, earning them diamond certification from the Recording Industry Association of America. Other top-selling R&B artists from this era included singer Toni Braxton, singer/songwriter/producer R. Kelly, and girl group En Vogue.

During the later part of the decade, neo soul, which added a 1970s soul music influence to the hip hop soul blend, arose, led by artists such as D'Angelo, Lauryn Hill, and Maxwell. Several artists, most notably Missy Elliott, further blurred the line between R&B and hip hop by recording in both genres simultaneously.

During the late-1990s and early 2000s, the influence of R&B on pop could be heard in the work of several pop musicians, most notably Jennifer Lopez and the later recordings of *NSYNC and the early recordings of 98 Degrees. *NSYNC's lead singer Justin Timberlake went on to make several solo recordings that showed heavy influences from both R&B and hip hop music. Other pop stars who perform heavily R&B influenced pop music (sometimes referred to as dirty pop, urban pop, or hip pop) include Britney Spears, Gwen Stefani, and Pink.

In the United Kingdom, R&B found its way into the UK garage subgenre of 2Step, typified by R&B-style singing accompanied by breakbeat/jungle rhythms. Among the most notable 2Step artists is Craig David, who crossed over to American R&B audiences in the early 2000s.

In the 2000s

By the 2000s, the cross-pollination between R&B and hip hop had increased to the point where, in most cases, the only prominent difference between a record being a hip hop record or an R&B record is whether its vocals are rapped or sung. Mainstream modern R&B has a sound more based on rhythm than hip hop soul had, and lacks the hardcore and soulful urban "grinding" feel on which hip-hop soul relied. That rhythmic element descends from new jack swing. R&B began to focus more on solo artists rather than groups as the 2000s progressed. As of 2005, the most prominent R&B artists include Usher, Beyonc (formerly of Destiny's Child), and Mariah Carey, whose music often blurs the line between contemporary R&B and pop.

Soulful R&B continues to be popular, with artists such as Alicia Keys, R. Kelly, John Legend, Toni Braxton and American Idol winner Fantasia showcasing classic influences in their work. Some R&B singers have used elements of Caribbean music in their work, especially dancehall and reggaeton.

Quiet storm, while still existent, is no longer a dominant presence on the pop charts, and is generally confined to urban adult contemporary radio. Most of the prominent quiet storm artists, including Babyface and Gerald Levert, began their careers in the 1980s and 1990s, although newer artists such as Kem also record in the quiet storm style. Its influence can still be seen in singles such as Mariah Carey's "We Belong Together".

In addition, several producers have developed specialized styles of song production. Timbaland, for example, became notable for his hip hop and jungle based syncopated productions in the late-1990s, during which time he produced R&B hits for Aaliyah, Ginuwine, and singer/rapper Missy Elliott. By the end of the decade, Timbaland's influences had shifted R&B songs towards a sound that approximated his own, with slightly less of a hip hop feel. Lil' Jon became famous for a style he termed crunk & B, deriving its influences from the Southern hip hop subclassification of crunk music. Jon gave R&B artist Ciara the title of "The First Lady of Crunk & B", and Brooke Valentine and Usher have also recorded R&B songs with strong crunk influences.

 

ENJOY... Embarrassed have funBig smile

muahzzz

XOXO
Celina/Cici

 



Edited by Celina7 - 21 January 2007 at 9:35pm

Sanjana4U IF-Dazzler
Sanjana4U
Sanjana4U

Joined: 13 October 2005
Posts: 4369

Posted: 15 December 2006 at 1:37pm | IP Logged
Great topic Celina Clap and thanks for the info!!!! Embarrassed Embarrassed Embarrassed

I m not really much into hip hop and R&B music...just listen to them sometime if i am listening on the radio...but if i had to pick one it would be Usher...I really liked the song "Yeah"...and also Sean Paul...his song "Temperature" sounds really good...that's all i know right now LOL LOL LOL
Celina7 IF-Rockerz
Celina7
Celina7

Joined: 04 March 2006
Posts: 5744

Posted: 15 December 2006 at 2:24pm | IP Logged

Originally posted by Sanjana4U

Great topic Celina Clap and thanks for the info!!!! Embarrassed Embarrassed Embarrassed

I m not really much into hip hop and R&B music...just listen to them sometime if i am listening on the radio...but if i had to pick one it would be Usher...I really liked the song "Yeah"...and also Sean Paul...his song "Temperature" sounds really good...that's all i know right now LOL LOL LOL

ooo hey sanjuEmbarrassedBig smile thanx hunEmbarrassed

hehe i lubb temperature.. my friendz n i did a performance at ma hs dance concert.. everybody liked itEmbarrassedTongue ya i lub dat song

usher.. i used 2 b a CRAZYYY fan of him so i have all his cdz, dvdz, posterz etc. lolz.. yea "yeah" ROCKZZZ ijus dont like lil jon dat muchConfused but he roxxxx... i like ma way, bad gurl, most of confessionz... 8701 has sum real good songz..n hez a great dancerWinkSmile

thanx hun.. most ppl like smack dat rite nowLOL (itz old now but..still)Tongue

Yasso Senior Member
Yasso
Yasso

Joined: 05 July 2006
Posts: 625

Posted: 15 December 2006 at 4:28pm | IP Logged

thanx hun.. most ppl like smack dat rite nowLOL (itz old now but..still)Tongue

omggg my favorite song luvv this song sooooooo much its so awsome...



Edited by Yasso - 15 December 2006 at 4:28pm
Celina7 IF-Rockerz
Celina7
Celina7

Joined: 04 March 2006
Posts: 5744

Posted: 15 December 2006 at 7:22pm | IP Logged
Originally posted by Yasso

thanx hun.. most ppl like smack dat rite nowLOL (itz old now but..still)Tongue

omggg my favorite song luvv this song sooooooo much its so awsome...

np yasso hun

hehe.. omgggg everybody likez smack dat even tho da radio stationz totally PLAY IT OUTLOL y i lubb it i wanna sing it rite nowBig smile

smack dat

all on da flo

smack dat

gimme sum more

smack dat

til u git sore

smack dat

oh ohh ohhhhhh

hope u like itBig smileLOL

Xx..£uvñëët..xX IF-Rockerz
Xx..£uvñëët..xX
Xx..£uvñëët..xX

Joined: 21 October 2005
Posts: 9551

Posted: 17 December 2006 at 6:08pm | IP Logged
omg wow Celinaaa u started another clubby thingo LOL Hug aww its awesome! great info btw! to be honest i havent read it all yet coz my head started spinning hehe but i willl soon i promise!

Yuppp i luvvv a lot of Hip Hop and RnB songs n artists.. as u guys said, Smack that is huuuuge even over here.. its doin real well! I luv it too! and Usher.. wow.. i reckon his song "Yeah!" really made him big in the scene in India as well, coz honestly there are jus soooo many remixes of it now and so many songs out in India as well which have adopted the background music from Yeah.. e.g. Akhiyan na Maar mere yaar mundeya, Mitra da hath pharke, Paisa, just to name a few
Reema_J IF-Sizzlerz
Reema_J
Reema_J

Joined: 18 November 2005
Posts: 17764

Posted: 18 December 2006 at 10:07am | IP Logged
Great topic and post Celina... you've completely done your homework, haven't you?! Wink

Well, to be honest... I don't listen to American music too much as compared to Indian but there are some songs that I love!

I'm not too much into rap, I prefer R&B but still... these days my ghetto side has been comin' out and I cannot get enough of Smack That and/or I Wanna Love You (both by Akon, featuring Eminem and Snoop Dogg, respectively)! Big smile

I love those two songs... in fact, I Wanna Love You is my current ringtone! LOL Embarrassed
Celina7 IF-Rockerz
Celina7
Celina7

Joined: 04 March 2006
Posts: 5744

Posted: 18 December 2006 at 10:55am | IP Logged

Originally posted by Reema_J

Great topic and post Celina... you've completely done your homework, haven't you?! Wink

Well, to be honest... I don't listen to American music too much as compared to Indian but there are some songs that I love!

I'm not too much into rap, I prefer R&B but still... these days my ghetto side has been comin' out and I cannot get enough of Smack That and/or I Wanna Love You (both by Akon, featuring Eminem and Snoop Dogg, respectively)! Big smile

I love those two songs... in fact, I Wanna Love You is my current ringtone! LOL Embarrassed

lolz ya di.. jus tryin 2 cum up wit new ideaz 2 make MC more active.. so we can have ALL kindz of muzik loverz postin.. n sharinEmbarrassed ( i kno 1st reggaeton n now this.. dont worry di i'll cum up wit more ideaz.. wheneva ma tiny brain startz workin.. which iz.. rarely lolz)LOL

o yaaa.. smack dat iz EVERYBODYz fav rite now i wonder yConfusedWinkLOL

omg di im in luv wit.. i wanna luv u u already knooo... ( i c u whinin grinin all up on da pole u see me lookin @ u baby so i wanna.. (i think i shud stop hereWinkLOL.. letz keep it clean n cute)Embarrassed but yes i lub it!Clap

noo probz di.. MC section rockz.. nething 4 muzikEmbarrassedBig smile



Edited by Celina7 - 18 December 2006 at 10:58am

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