Bollywood News, Bollywood Movies, Bollywood Chat

   

BOMBAY TALKIES REVIEWS (Page 5)

Post Reply New Post

Page 5 of 11

RockChicGirl

IF-Stunnerz

RockChicGirl

Joined: 04 October 2004

Posts: 42675

Posted: 29 April 2013 at 3:30am | IP Logged
So happy for the positive reviews on Nawaz.

The following 1 member(s) liked the above post:

-Swetha-

Dear Guest, Being an unregistered member you are missing out on participating in the lively discussions happening on the topic "BOMBAY TALKIES REVIEWS (Page 5)" in Bollywood News, Bollywood Movies, Bollywood Chat forum. In addition you lose out on the fun interactions with fellow members and other member exclusive features that India-Forums has to offer. Join India's most popular discussion portal on Indian Entertainment. It's FREE and registration is effortless so JOIN NOW!

chocolover89

IF-Sizzlerz

chocolover89

Joined: 30 June 2005

Posts: 23875

Posted: 29 April 2013 at 1:10pm | IP Logged

  1. J ?@jiteshpillaai4m

    Proud and a revelation how we can tell stories so swiftly under 22 minutes each. Minor quibbles aside, BT has heart, soul and a sharp mind

  2. J ?@jiteshpillaai7m

    Anurag kashyap nails it with a bitter-sweet tale of an amitabh bachchan fan. The clever twist in the end is a nice touch. Go watch

    J ?@jiteshpillaai10m
  3. Karan johar comes of age. Superlative acts from saquib saleem, rani mukherjee. Bombay talkies reinvents karan johar for us. Take a bow


  4. J ?@jiteshpillaai11m

    Dibakar bannerjee's heartbreaking story of a junior artiste. Nawazuddin siddique's absolutely fantastic and rivetting performance.Must watch

    J ?@jiteshpillaai13m
  5. 4 stories. 4 directors. Love longing, heartbreak, passion. Indian cinema comes of age. Bombay talkies is both raw, and a gentle wallop


Rahul Khanna ?@R_Khanna1m

Just watched a screening of #BombayTalkies & it was absolutely OUTSTANDING! Congratulations @KJohar25, Dibaker, Zoya & Anurag!



Edited by chocolover89 - 29 April 2013 at 1:21pm

The following 7 member(s) liked the above post:

-Swetha-WaitForIt-sub_rosatvdekha.GundayVedantMR.KooLRockChicGirl

Meherbaan

IF-Rockerz

Meherbaan

Joined: 23 February 2013

Posts: 5901

Posted: 30 April 2013 at 3:58pm | IP Logged
Dark Knight ?@iamkyr5t

Overall, the best movie was by Dibakar, hands down, & the lovely one by zoya starring katrina kaif, ranvir & the sweet kids is a close 2nd.


Dark Knight ?@iamkyr5t

Anurag Kashyap's movie has the best dialogues :D fun story, & the bgm of Bacchan is catchy, good performances #BombayTalkies


Dark Knight ?@iamkyr5t

. @kjohar25 's movie has the most memorable dialogue,when saquib comments on Rani, "Galee mein mangalsutra, aur ankhon mein Kamasutra":D #BT


Dark Knight ?@iamkyr5t

Also, kudos to @kjohar25 for taking on a bold subject, & doing it justice. The last scene stays with you fir a long time #BombayTalkies


Dark Knight ?@iamkyr5t

The young kid in Zoya Akhtar's movie is so talented! Everyone will love his work, Ranvir pulls of a middle class father effortlessly!


Dark Knight ?@iamkyr6t

Wow, Dibakar Banarjee's short movie is sooo amazing! Nawazuddin Siddiqui steals the show. Guys #BombayTalkies a must watch!

Dark Knight ?@iamkyr5t

For those katrina kaif fans, who find her inspiring now, watch out for Zoya Akhtar's brilliant,beautiful & sweet, short movie #BombayTalkies



Edited by B0llyw00dL0ver - 01 May 2013 at 12:31am

The following 1 member(s) liked the above post:

sub_rosa

chocolover89

IF-Sizzlerz

chocolover89

Joined: 30 June 2005

Posts: 23875

Posted: 30 April 2013 at 9:30pm | IP Logged
Bombay Talkies
By Taran Adarsh, 1 May 2013, 08:31 hrs IST
4
It's a fact... Cinema and cricket are pursued with religious fervor in India. Cinema connects us. Cinema unites us. Cinema is indeed the predominant influence on our lives. Cinema is, without doubt, an integral part of every movie lover... Indian cinema, which completes its 100th year this year [RAJA HARISHCHANDRA, the first full-length feature-film made by Dadasaheb Phalke, was released in 1913], ought to be commemorated. What better way than four avant garde film-makers combining forces to pay respect to cinema -- Karan Johar, Zoya Akhtar, Dibakar Banerjee and Anurag Kashyap. Backed by Viacom18, the four prolific film-makers set out to narrate stories that are unconventional, borrowed from real life, about the common man. Also, each of those stories has a reference to Indian cinema/stars. 

The four stories in BOMBAY TALKIES -- made at a stipulated budget of Rs 1.5 cr each, the duration not exceeding 20/25 minutes -- are entwined in one film. Of course, experiments like this, when one or multiple raconteurs join hands to narrate distinctive stories, aren't new. Recall DARNA MANA HAI [2003; Prawaal Raman narrated a series of six stories in one film], DARNA ZAROORI HAI [2006; seven directors narrating seven different stories], SALAAM-E-ISHQ [2007; six love stories helmed by Nikhil Advani] and DUS KAHANIYAAN [2007; ten stories narrated by six directors]… 

A film like BOMBAY TALKIES gives an opportunity to film-makers to step out of their comfort zone and try to create something novel. It's a podium that does not necessarily cater to the box-office or the diaspora alone. Also, it helps the film-maker to tap the latent talent that he/she possesses, but it's never nurtured due to commercial constraints. The challenge lies in not merely narrating a story within a budget, but also narrating a tale effectively encompassing myriad emotions…

Karan Johar
Plot: All's well between an urban couple [Randeep Hooda, Rani Mukerji] till the wife meets a colleague [Saqib Saleem] at work. It changes their lives forever. 

Think of Karan Johar and you can't help but recall larger than life movies, music, dances, emotions, drama, grandiose sets, stunning locales, chic outfits… But Karan does an about-turn with the story in BOMBAY TALKIES. Of course, in films like KABHI ALVIDA NAA KEHNA and MY NAME IS KHAN, Karan did make an attempt to push the envelope, but with the short story in BOMBAY TALKIES, he narrates a story that no film-maker has endeavored to narrate on the Hindi screen. I was in a state of disbelief because I never expected Karan to narrate an account with such flourish in those 20 odd minutes. Karan reinvents himself here! 

The story revolves around three characters and each of them delivers bravura performances. Rani is efficient, as always. Randeep is finally getting the characters that do justice to his talent. But it is Saqib Saleem who stuns you with a dazzling performance. Kudos to Karan for taking a giant leap as a storyteller and depicting a harsh reality with brilliance! 

Dibakar Banerjee
Plot: An actor [Nawazuddin Siddiqui] is struggling to make a living. While watching a film shoot one day, he gets an opportunity that helps him prove himself to his daughter. 

Based on Satyajit Ray's short story 'Patol Babu, Film Star', Dibakar changes the setting from middle class Kolkata to middle class Dadar in Mumbai. With this story, Dibakar attempts to underline the actuality that personal contentment cannot be weighed against monetary incentives. In the end, the contentment on Nawaz's face, his body language as he narrates a story to his daughter, the cheerfulness he radiates seems so bona fide. You must hand it to Dibakar for transporting to the fore a story that makes you reflect on the various decisions of your past. 

There are two vital performers in this story -- Nawazuddin and Sadashiv Amrapurkar. Nawazuddin is brilliant all through, specifically in the sequence when he rushes home to his daughter to narrate a new story. It's indeed a pleasure to watch the supremely talented Sadashiv Amrapurkar after a hiatus. 

Anurag Kashyap
Plot: A young man [Vineet Kumar Singh] arrives in Mumbai from Allahabad to fulfill his ailing father's [Sudhir Pande] last wish. 

Anurag is known for pushing the boundaries, for thinking out of the box, for swimming against the tide… most importantly, he's known for encouraging new, deserving talent. Anurag too does an about-turn and makes a film that's in sharp contrast to the 'dark films' he's synonymous with. The story he narrates evokes myriad emotions -- it makes you chuckle, it makes you feel sympathetic towards the millions of hopeful who arrive in the city, it makes you moist-eyed when something drastic transpires during the train journey. With this film, Anurag should silence the naysayers who feel he restricts himself to confined themes only. 

Vineet Kumar Singh is a talent to watch out for. The vulnerability of an outsider when he arrives in a metropolis like Mumbai is projected radiantly by this young actor. Sudhir Pande is first-rate. But it is Amitabh Bachchan's super cameo that adjoins credence to the sequence of events. 

Zoya Akhtar
Plot: A kid [Naman Jain] from a middle class family is captivated by an actress [Katrina Kaif]. He decides to break the rules of the society and chase his dreams. 

Parents who thrust their condescending ambitions on their kids are not new for Bollywood. Zoya tackled a similar plot in LUCK BY CHANCE [recall Dimple Kapadia's character]. Now Zoya drives home a pertinent message through a kid here. The middle class setting, the defenselessness of the kids, the dilemma when parents decide what their kids ought to be when they grow up… Zoya's handling of the delicate moments stay with you. The usage of 'My Name Is Sheela' [from TEES MAAR KHAN] is the icing on the cake and the kid's moves are amazing. 

While Ranvir Shorey enacts the part of the disciplinarian father to perfection, it's the performance of the two kids -- Naman and Khushi Dubey -- that are most rewarding. Naman in particular is the star of the story. Katrina Kaif appears in a sparkling cameo. 

The film concludes with a tribute to Indian cinema, which brings as many as twenty top stars together on the same platform [choreography: Vaibhavi Merchant]. 

On the whole, BOMBAY TALKIES is one of those infrequent movies wherein you get to eyeball the superior efforts of four top notch film-makers in less than two hours. This reality alone makes the film a compelling watch, while the superior performances and absorbing themes that the movie prides itself in only serve as an icing on the cake. This celebration of cinema is a must watch!

The following 6 member(s) liked the above post:

sub_rosaWaitForIt-M1s5_5unsh1n3Meherbaan-Gangster-HotMess

Deathstroke

IF-Sizzlerz

Deathstroke

Joined: 30 June 2011

Posts: 17571

Posted: 01 May 2013 at 7:04pm | IP Logged


  • 0
     

Bombay TalkiesNote: The official Indicine review of Bombay Talkies will be out on Friday.

A girl on a railway station who croons Lata Mangeshkar songs with aching luminosity, a stoic gluttonous ostrich, a flirty cocky gay entertainment journalist, a closet actor, a little boy who likes to dance like Katrina Kaif and a man from Allahabad who just wants to meet Amitabh Bachchan for a few seconds … Such are the engrossing characters that populate the unforgettable world of "Bombay Talkies".

"Bombay Talkies" is that rarity, which makes us thankful for the gift of the movies.

Four stories directed by four contemporary Bollywood directors emerge and merge with seamless splendour into a pastiche of pain and pleasure. Like four scoops of ice cream, one yummier than the other, "Bombay Talkies" serves up a flavourful quartet of delights that leave us craving for more. It's like that song written by the immortal Sahir Ludhianvi – "Abhi na jao chhod kar ke dil abhi bhara nahin".

No, that song isn't part of the film. But there are songs of the melody queen Lataji which haunt your senses as the restless edgy protagonists, each in search of an emotional liberation that strikes them in unexpected ways at the end of every story, seek a slice of cloudburst to nourish their parched spirits.

So on to the first and my favourite story directed by Karan Johar where a sterile marriage between an urban working-couple played by Rani Mukerji and Randeep Hooda is shaken by the arrival of young ebullient homosexual who enters their frozen marriage in a most unexpected way.

This story more than any other, pushes Indian cinema to the edge to explore a theme and emotions that have so far been swept under the carpet. Karan, whose most brilliant film "My Name Is Khan", was also about a marginalised community, strips the urban relationship of all its shock value. He looks at the three characters' frightening spiritual emptiness with a dispassion that was denied to the characters in his earlier exploration of crumbling marital values in "Kabhi Alvida Naa Kehna".

Thanks to the unsparing editing by Deepa Bhatia, a gently arousing background score by Hitesh Sonik, deft but credible dialogues penned by Niranjan Iyenger and camerawork by Anil Mehta that sweeps gently across three wounded lives, Karan is able to nail the poignancy and the irony of his urban fable in just four-five key scenes. This is his best work to date. Rani delivers another power-packed performance. It's Saqib Saleem who steals this segment with his unmitigated spontaneity and reined-in ebullience.

The second story by Dibakar Bannerjee features that wonderful chameleon actor Nawazuddin Siddiqui as a man who would have been an actor if only life's drudgeries had not overtaken his life. Dibakar is a master-creator of vignettes from everyday life. Here his detailing of chawl life is unerring.

Nikos Andritsakis's cinematography doesn't miss a single nuance in Nawaz's sad yet hopeful, bleak yet bright existence. The sequence where Siddiqui washes clothes with the chawl's women is savagely funny and poignant, as is his life-changing moment when Nawaz gets to perform one shot with Ranbir Kapoor. No we don't see Ranbir, we just feel his presence, and we also hear filmmaker Reema Kagti giving orders from the directorial chair, but we don't see her either.

Nawaz in Dibakar's deft hands, takes his character through a journey of profoundly saddening self-discovery without any hint of self-pity. This segment is quirky funny and tragic. No one is allowed to feel sorry for Nawaz's character. Not even Nawaz.

Ebullient and enchanting are the descriptions that come to mind while watching Zoya Akhtar's film about a little boy (Naman Jain, brilliant) who would rather dance to Katrina Kaif's song than become a cricketer or a pilot, as per the wishes of his tyrant papa (Ranveer Shorey).

The household brims over with song, dance and giggles between the Katrina-enamoured boy and his sibling and confidante (a very confident Khushi Dubey). Charming warm humorous and vivacious Zoya's film serves up a very gentle moral lesson. Let a child grow the way it wants to. Zoya's film makes our hearts acquire wings. And yes, it immortalises Katrina Kaif.

Finally, Anurag Kashyap's homage to the unmatchable stardom of Amitabh Bachchan. A simple fable of a man journeying from Allahabad to meet Bachchan, this segment is more baggy and loose-limbed than the other three tightly-edited stories. This is not to take away from its power. As played by Vineet Kumar Singh, the Common Man's devotion to the Bachchan aura is manifested in the tongue-in-cheek spoken lines and the casual energy of Mumbai's street life.

Anurag captures the sometimes-funny often-sad bustle around the Bachchan bungalow with warmth and affection. The segment certainly doesn't lack in warmth. But it could have done with a tighter grip over the narrative.

"Bombay Talkies" is segmented and layered, yet cohesive and compelling from the first frame to the last. While unravelling the magic of cinema and its impact on the minds of audiences, "Bombay Talkies" also displays how much cinema has evolved over the generations.

This is a beguiling, beautiful and befitting homage to 100 years of Indian cinema. It's also proof that different stories in an episodic film could comfortably have directors with different sensitivities staring in the same line of vision.

If you watch only one film a year make sure it's this one.

Yup, thank god for the motion picture.

Rating: ★★★★★

Subhash K Jha

Luvsushanki

IF-Dazzler

Luvsushanki

Joined: 27 December 2011

Posts: 3003

Posted: 01 May 2013 at 10:15pm | IP Logged
will watch it

sub_rosa

IF-Dazzler

sub_rosa

Joined: 24 December 2008

Posts: 3633

Posted: 02 May 2013 at 8:49am | IP Logged

Film Review | Bombay Talkies

What happens when insiders take inspiration from within their industry? Usually they over-romanticize
CommentE-mailPrint
First Published: Thu, May 02 2013. 05 08 PM IST
Rani Mukerji in a still from 'Bombay Talkies'
Rani Mukerji in a still from 'Bombay Talkies'
Updated: Thu, May 02 2013. 05 47 PM IST
Miniature prints
A tribute is hardly ever the truth. Maybe just a sliver of the truth. You simplify, romanticize and gloss over what's unpalatable about your subject—distilling a kind of agreeable net worth. The romanticizing is perhaps bound to be more pronounced if the subject is one of your own.
Most of Bombay Talkies, four miniatures by directors Karan Johar, Dibakar Banerjee, Zoya Akhtar and Anurag Kashyap, meant to commemorate 100 years of Hindi cinema, is that stereotypical tribute. There is warmhearted humour and a playful, anodyne gaze at Hindi cinema's power and role in the life of India, largely Mumbai. They don't question its workings or provoke strong reactions on its hyper-presence in our life. More disappointing, none of the stories have a personal stamp—in aesthetics or point of view.
Johar's film is about a couple, a journalist who edits an entertainment tabloid (Rani Mukerji) and a television news anchor (Randeep Hooda) whose marriage is bereft of intimacy. A young intern at her office, who abruptly becomes her best friend, scratches the surface of this relationship, and secrets emerge. Johar's confused and abrasive lead character is a connoissuer and collector of vintage Hindi film music and has a room in his house, stacked with LPs and memorabilia. Here, he misses an opportunity to discover new love. Two of Lata Mangeshkar's most popular and exquisite songs, Ajeeb dastan hai yeh and Lag jaa gale, accentuate the narrative.
The lead performances lift the narrative above its predictable curve and earnest tone—both Mukerji and Hooda make the most of every scene they have without going overboard with histrionics. This is Johar's most mature, if sentimental, look at homosexuality. Hindi cinema is a tertiary flourish in his story.
photo
Nawazuddin Siddiqui
Nawazuddin Siddiqui plays a thwarted actor with a troubled past with his mentor and a difficult present in Banerjee's story—the most cinematic of all the films. Storytelling, cinematography, music, editing and acting are in meaningful synthesis. Siddiqui lives in a chawl in Mumbai with his wife and a bedridden, depressed daughter. He tells her stories about Bollywood and Bollywood stars who he meets while trying to find work in the film industry. In an absurdist twist, Banerjee introduces a gawky emu into this congested and loud chawl milieu, which the actor owns. The emu is a reminder of one of his failed projects but has become his pet. One day, he is randomly chosen for an extra's role on a film shoot. Within that span of a few minutes, he questions himself and his dreams. Sadashiv Amrapurkar has an engaging cameo.
Siddiqui is at his peak of acting prowess. In Banerjee's direction and the writing, pathos and humour intermingle, and Siddiqui brings out the character's fine print without the crutch of lines. It is a little more safe to say that Siddiqui is today's most engrossing acting talent in Hindi films. Nikos Andritsakis' cinematography produces some gems, including a surreal sequence in which the actor shakily rehearses his blink-and-miss role in an open space surrounded by glass high-rises. Under a scorching sun, he meets an old man and an emu. Indisputably, the best-executed story in Bombay Talkies.
photo
Naman Jain
Akhtar's protagonist is a boy (Naman Jain) in love with jhatak-matak Bollywood. He wants to doll up and dance to film songs. Katrina Kaif worship leads him to a hallucinatory life lesson. His tyrannical father (Ranvir Shorey), of course, wants him to toughen up by playing football and cricket. Jain is adorable as the conflicted boy. Art direction is authentic and Akhtar's forte, her ability to work with actors, and a charming climax somewhat make up for the thin story.
photo
Vineet Kumar Singh
An Allahabad boy's travails outside Pratiksha, the most famous Bollywood address, is the subject of Anurag Kashyap's story. He looks at hero worship through a father and son duo in Allahabad. The ageing father's (Sudhir Pandey) last wish is to share a morabba (pickled Indian gooseberry), a traditional UP kitchen staple, with his hero Amitabh Bachchan. The son (Vineet Kumar Singh) arrives in Mumbai with the bottle carrying the morabba and embarks on a mission. Kashyap's writing crackles. Dialogues and the humour are sharp. The story is a full-throttle ode to Bachchan—with a song, a cameo by the superstar and a fairly convincing portrait of Bachchan-worship in Mumbai. The house, Pratiksha, is a metaphor for all that is desirable and daunting about Bollywood.
Bombay Talkies is set to excellent music by Amit Trivedi and while they unfold, the stories hold up in their half-hour individual length. But after you have left the theatre, it is not gratification you feel, but the short-lived aftertaste of a music video or a good commercial. It eulogizes Bollywood, sure, but in a Bollywood-crazy nation it is like preaching to the converted. Surely there is more to the desire, madness, ugliness and fantasy in Hindi cinema, and to the millions who work here. If you wait to watch the terrible promotional video at the end of the film, starring all our stars, you will most likely forget the best of Bombay Talkies.
Bombay Talkies releases in theatres on Friday.

MR.KooL

IF-Stunnerz

MR.KooL

Joined: 06 March 2011

Posts: 39636

Posted: 02 May 2013 at 10:24am | IP Logged
Thursday, May 02, 2013 8:38:56 AM (IST)  

Hindi Film Review: 'Bombay Talkies'

Film: "Bombay Talkies"; Cast: Rani Mukerji, Randeep Hooda, Saqib Saleem, Nawazuddin Siddiqui, Sadashiv Amrapurkar, Naman Jain, Khushi Dubey, Vineet Kumar Singh, Sudhir Pandey and Amitabh Bachchan; Directors: Karan Johar, Dibakar Bannerjee, Zoya Akhtar, and Anurag Kashyap; Rating: *****

May 2 (IANS): A girl on a railway station who croons Lata Mangeshkar songs with aching luminosity, a stoic gluttonous ostrich, a flirty cocky gay entertainment journalist, a closet actor, a little boy who likes to dance like Katrina Kaif and a man from Allahabad who just wants to meet Amitabh Bachchan for a few seconds ... Such are the engrossing characters that populate the unforgettable world of "Bombay Talkies".

"Bombay Talkies" is that rarity, which makes us thankful for the gift of the movies.

Four stories directed by four contemporary Bollywood directors emerge and merge with seamless splendour into a pastiche of pain and pleasure. Like four scoops of ice cream, one yummier than the other, "Bombay Talkies" serves up a flavourful quartet of delights that leave us craving for more. It's like that song written by the immortal Sahir Ludhianvi - "Abhi na jao chhod kar ke dil abhi bhara nahin".

No, that song isn't part of the film. But there are songs of the melody queen Lataji which haunt your senses as the restless edgy protagonists, each in search of an emotional liberation that strikes them in unexpected ways at the end of every story, seek a slice of cloudburst to nourish their parched spirits.

So on to the first and my favourite story directed by Karan Johar where a sterile marriage between an urban working-couple played by Rani Mukerji and Randeep Hooda is shaken by the arrival of young ebullient homosexual who enters their frozen marriage in a most unexpected way.

This story more than any other, pushes Indian cinema to the edge to explore a theme and emotions that have so far been swept under the carpet. Karan, whose most brilliant film "My Name Is Khan", was also about a marginalised community, strips the urban relationship of all its shock value. He looks at the three characters' frightening spiritual emptiness with a dispassion that was denied to the characters in his earlier exploration of crumbling marital values in "Kabhi Alvida Naa Kehna".

Thanks to the unsparing editing by Deepa Bhatia, a gently arousing background score by Hitesh Sonik, deft but credible dialogues penned by Niranjan Iyenger and camerawork by Anil Mehta that sweeps gently across three wounded lives, Karan is able to nail the poignancy and the irony of his urban fable in just four-five key scenes. This is his best work to date. Rani delivers another power-packed performance. It's Saqib Saleem who steals this segment with his unmitigated spontaneity and reined-in ebullience.

The second story by Dibakar Bannerjee features that wonderful chameleon actor Nawazuddin Siddiqui as a man who would have been an actor if only life's drudgeries had not overtaken his life. Dibakar is a master-creator of vignettes from everyday life. Here his detailing of chawl life is unerring.

Nikos Andritsakis's cinematography doesn't miss a single nuance in Nawaz's sad yet hopeful, bleak yet bright existence. The sequence where Siddiqui washes clothes with the chawl's women is savagely funny and poignant, as is his life-changing moment when Nawaz gets to perform one shot with Ranbir Kapoor. No we don't see Ranbir, we just feel his presence, and we also hear filmmaker Reema Kagti giving orders from the directorial chair, but we don't see her either.

Nawaz in Dibakar's deft hands, takes his character through a journey of profoundly saddening self-discovery without any hint of self-pity. This segment is quirky funny and tragic. No one is allowed to feel sorry for Nawaz's character. Not even Nawaz.

Ebullient and enchanting are the descriptions that come to mind while watching Zoya Akhtar's film about a little boy (Naman Jain, brilliant) who would rather dance to Katrina Kaif's song than become a cricketer or a pilot, as per the wishes of his tyrant papa (Ranveer Shorey).

The household brims over with song, dance and giggles between the Katrina-enamoured boy and his sibling and confidante (a very confident Khushi Dubey). Charming warm humorous and vivacious Zoya's film serves up a very gentle moral lesson. Let a child grow the way it wants to. Zoya's film makes our hearts acquire wings. And yes, it immortalises Katrina Kaif.

Finally, Anurag Kashyap's homage to the unmatchable stardom of Amitabh Bachchan. A simple fable of a man journeying from Allahabad to meet Bachchan, this segment is more baggy and loose-limbed than the other three tightly-edited stories. This is not to take away from its power. As played by Vineet Kumar Singh, the Common Man's devotion to the Bachchan aura is manifested in the tongue-in-cheek spoken lines and the casual energy of Mumbai's street life.

Anurag captures the sometimes-funny often-sad bustle around the Bachchan bungalow with warmth and affection. The segment certainly doesn't lack in warmth. But it could have done with a tighter grip over the narrative.

"Bombay Talkies" is segmented and layered, yet cohesive and compelling from the first frame to the last. While unravelling the magic of cinema and its impact on the minds of audiences, "Bombay Talkies" also displays how much cinema has evolved over the generations.

This is a beguiling, beautiful and befitting homage to 100 years of Indian cinema. It's also proof that different stories in an episodic film could comfortably have directors with different sensitivities staring in the same line of vision.

If you watch only one film a year make sure it's this one.

Post Reply New Post

Go to top

Related Topics

  Topics Topic Starter Replies Views Last Post
SEXUALLY REPRESSED Rani in BOMBAY TALKIES!!!! WhipCreamPantie 8 1168 26 April 2013 at 6:12am
By Gujar
ROCKSTAR Reviews - ALL REVIEWS POST HERE

2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 129 130

-Mmmmm- 1032 72890 08 December 2011 at 5:37am
By zaara.khan
Raajneeti Reviews: First one up (ALL Reviews Here)

2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 31 32

dazzelll 248 35821 14 August 2010 at 4:47pm
By .shona.
PYAAR IMPOSSIBLE Reviews here + member reviews

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Varun_Mehta 72 16245 13 January 2010 at 9:05pm
By Dexterkichokri
REVIEWS REVIEWS REVIEWS! preity*zinta 0 2674 08 November 2007 at 1:48pm
By preity*zinta

Forum Quick Jump

Forum Category

Active Forums

Bollywood News, Bollywood Movies, Bollywood Chat Topic Index

Limit search to this Forum only.

 

Disclaimer: All Logos and Pictures of various Channels, Shows, Artistes, Media Houses, Companies, Brands etc. belong to their respective owners, and are used to merely visually identify the Channels, Shows, Companies, Brands, etc. to the viewer. Incase of any issue please contact the webmaster.