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sashashyam

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sashashyam

Joined: 04 January 2012

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Posted: 05 November 2012 at 1:02pm | IP Logged
My dear Sanchayita,

I am truly delighted and flattered by the degree of interest with which you have received my post, and I am sure you are going to have a lot of fun looking out for the finer points in many of the future Arjun episodes.

Beside this  aspect, you know, after watching a dozen of them, what struck me was the dark side of life and relationships that the series often brings out, going beyond the usual greed or jealousy.

The exchange murders  episode (No.9). about a rich businessman and a waiter who commit each other's murders,  was relatively straightforward and clearly based on the Hitchcock classic film Strangers on a Train.

But there was also a dishonourable love that clashes with the normal protectiveness of maternal love, as in the dead stockbroker story, where the mother's apparent readiness to let her own daughter be accused of the murder she had committed was so shocking. It was a similar clash in the case of the mute witness, the boy who idolizes Eagleman, only there it is the opposite, for the mother is ready  to assume the guilt for what her son has done, for she holds herself morally  responsible for it. In both cases, the immoral behaviour of the mother ruins a whole family.

The shocking kinnara human sacrifice story is also rooted in a terrible alienation from society, and in the murder by peanuts (No.3), it is revenge for the unbearable loss of a beloved sister. No wonder Arjun, whose own life has been twisted beyond repair by a brutal criminal, empathises with the younger sister, even if she has murdered two persons in cold blood.

It is in this plumbing of the dark corners of the human psyche that Arjun,  for me, stands out. It is not just a gung ho, cops and robbers serial, with macho cops strutting around punching people. I hope it stays that way.

And as for Rathore, your assessment is spot on. It is absolutely not necessary to be exceptional to be regarded as a good cop. Moreover, to  be the kind of good chief that Rathore  is, what is needed is the ability to get the best out of each team member, to carry them all with him, and stand up for them vis a vis the superiors when necessary. All of which Rathore takes care of perfectly.

Lastly,  as you enjoy detailed analysis, if you have the time, you  might like to take a look at the only 2 of the kind I had done earlier, the second a month ago. These were

1)No. 15 ; about the swimming pool murder (at 

http://www.india-forums.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=3220402

2) No.16, the case of the dead stockbroker  (at http://www.india-forums.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=3229686).

I would welcome your comments.

Shyamala Aunty


Originally posted by SanchayitaM



Yes. I too agree on Rathore's contribution in ETF team was kind of underestimated from the very start, may be to highlight Arjun. But, his wittyness came to rise from the KalkiDevi episode. Rathore is the ideal chief for the ETF team. I think Rathore is best as he is, for its not necessary to be exceptional to be regarded as a good cop. The quality and intelligence he posses is definately praise-worthy.

As far as Arjun is concerned he is an asset for the team and the society because of his exceptionality. He is best in his own way.

And your analysis is causing my interest to grow more and more to come across and discovered these loop-holes and make out the significance of each and every move. I am honoured to receive this column from your pen. And I am eager to get more and more from you in near future. I sincerely wait for your analysis. Do grace us with your columns, for we really these reviews to know more. Thanks again.


I agree that Rathore was finally  given his due today, and I am glad both of you noticed and appreciated that. The ETF  is after all a team, and Rathore is a very thorough and conscientious, if somewhat conventional police officer. All he lacks is imagination - the ability to think out of the box and from under the guilty party's skin -  which is naturally the sole preserve of our boy wonder Arjun!

The second crucial point  made by Rathore was Kevin da Costa was a Catholic, and so he would have been buried, not cremated, as Sandhya was, and so his remains would be available for a post mortem to determine if he dies due a poison. That was an even more crucial point than the discovery of the earring. It is another matter that the first exhumation attempt fails due to the 'castling' technique from chess having been very cleverly adapted to his own ends by Hiten, by exchanging the headstones.

Two other points come to mind in this context. Exchanging two such large and heavy headstones could not have been easy, and how did Hiten do this undetected in a graveyard? He would have had to work at night, and if the caretaker had caught him he would have been in trouble. If he had bribed him to keep quiet, there would always have been the risk of subsequent blackmail.

Secondly, for all his cleverness and smugness, it is Hiten who digs his own grave, so to speak, by explaining the 'castling' move to Arjun in a fit of arrogant condescension. If he had not done that, Arjun would not have been able to figure out how Kevin's supposed body turned out to be clean, and he would have been stuck.

In the end, Hiten's ability to outthink his opponent fails, because he goes only one step, not two ahead, concerning what he assumes is an exchange of the glasses. Arjun, in contrast,  goes the full two steps - he knows that Hiten will assume that he has indeed exchanged the glasses and will pick up the other one, and he spikes him by doing nothing at all. This was  the cleverest thing he does that evening, cleverer than the acid reflux hoax, for he manages to outsmart a man whose specialty is thinking  2 steps ahead of his opponent, and this without even being a chess expert!

That passage reminded me of the showdown between Sherlock Holmes, the most famous fictional detective of all time, and his nemesis Professor Moriarty. It came down there too, in The Final Problem,  to Holmes outthinking Moriarty in exactly the same fashion, though the actions were quite different. I do not want to bore you with more details, but if any of you is at all interested in pure detection, the Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle are an excellent read even today, 130 years after the first was written.

In fact, I think Arjun has a lot of Holmes in his characterisation - with the same arrogance of intelligence, the same contemptuous impatience with lesser minds, the same abruptness and lack of social skills. But then Holmes was never part of any team, nor was he a policeman. Arjun is both, and so some fine tuning seems called for to smoothen out his rough edges , which I think is happening.

Sorry to have inflicted such a long response on you young ladies, but I am glad Tani did a special on yesterday's excellent episode, which I liked a lot, whence these amplifications that I hope you and some others might find of interest.

Shyamala B.Cowsik

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arrylineLove_Arnie

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sashashyam

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sashashyam

Joined: 04 January 2012

Posts: 7570

Posted: 05 November 2012 at 1:16pm | IP Logged
My dear Arya,

Of course you can call me Shyamala Aunty, In fact that would make me feel quite  at home!

I will try and do this week's combo analysis tomorrow, and will also try hard to compress it so that the length does not put anyone off!

Shyamala Aunty

Originally posted by arryline


Myself Arya and I hope I can call you Shyamala AuntySmileWas a bit apprehensive to with your permission.

Very well said even though it's hard to define Ariya's relationship due to Riya's death and their changing equation a very well noted fact can't be denied that she affected him.

It would be lovely to read your analysis.Really looking forward towards itSmile

[QUOTE=sashashyam]My dear Arryline,(could I perhaps have your real name, unless you prefer not ?),

I am very glad that you too had the patience to read and appreciate my supplement to Tani's analysis of yesterday's superb episode. I did my last and comprehensive take on the Death of a Stockbroker  a month ago (I don't know if you had the chance to see that at

http://www.india-forums.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=3229686

), and since then, I have not done anything more, except for a heartfelt lament about Riya's completely unnecessary and abrupt removal from the scene. In this context, I agree completely with you that her continued presence would have had a mellowing effect on Arjun,  no matter how abrupt he continued to be with her. He had actually got around to saying "Riya, you are welcome"!

To revert, I did not post any more partly because the episodes that followed, up to the death of Riya,  did not offer much scope for my kind of stuff, and partly because I was a tad apprehensive about being not in tune with the vast majority of the forum, and thus boring you young people to death!Wink Since your message indicates that this is not quite the case, I will take your suggestion on board and do one on both the episodes of this week, which were a study in contrast if ever there was one, since I have a couple of more points to add wrt the latest. Perhaps also on that of the previous Saturday, which was a study in guilt struggling with maternal protectiveness. Rather like the stockbroker episode, except that this mother turned up trumps!

Please don't blame me if this ends up as an overdose; remember it was you who, most flatteringly, asked for it!Wink

Shyamala B.Cowsik

[QUOTE=arryline]
Just loved your detailed analysis,Infact I was waiting for your analysis on saturday's episode too.Rightly pointed out it was really good to see Rathore doing his rightful part in the team.His discovery was surely something that flowed with Arjun's theory unlike other times where both of their theories contradict.The bond between them to is growing so it's a welcome change.

Coming to Hiten,as Arjun says every culprit at some point makes a mistake similarly Hiten too dug his grave .Arjun and Sherlock Holmes part totally agreed,and as you pointed out I feel the fine tuning will be done for him only by the ETF team and if Riya would have been then it would have been a huge contribution from her sideSmile


[QUOTE=arryline]




Love_Arnie

IF-Sizzlerz

Love_Arnie

Joined: 31 July 2012

Posts: 10902

Posted: 06 November 2012 at 8:19am | IP Logged
Originally posted by sashashyam

My dear Sanchayita,I am truly delighted and flattered by the degree of interest with which you have received my post, and I am sure you are going to have a lot of fun looking out for the finer points in many of the future Arjun episodes. Beside this  aspect, you know, after watching a dozen of them, what struck me was the dark side of life and relationships that the series often brings out, going beyond the usual greed or jealousy. The exchange murders  episode (No.9). about a rich businessman and a waiter who commit each other's murders,  was relatively straightforward and clearly based on the Hitchcock classic film Strangers on a Train. But there was also a dishonourable love that clashes with the normal protectiveness of maternal love, as in the dead stockbroker story, where the mother's apparent readiness to let her own daughter be accused of the murder she had committed was so shocking. It was a similar clash in the case of the mute witness, the boy who idolizes Eagleman, only there it is the opposite, for the mother is ready  to assume the guilt for what her son has done, for she holds herself morally  responsible for it. In both cases, the immoral behaviour of the mother ruins a whole family. The shocking kinnara human sacrifice story is also rooted in a terrible alienation from society, and in the murder by peanuts (No.3), it is revenge for the unbearable loss of a beloved sister. No wonder Arjun, whose own life has been twisted beyond repair by a brutal criminal, empathises with the younger sister, even if she has murdered two persons in cold blood.It is in this plumbing of the dark corners of the human psyche that Arjun,  for me, stands out. It is not just a gung ho, cops and robbers serial, with macho cops strutting around punching people. I hope it stays that way.And as for Rathore, your assessment is spot on. It is absolutely not necessary to be exceptional to be regarded as a good cop. Moreover, to  be the kind of good chief that Rathore  is, what is needed is the ability to get the best out of each team member, to carry them all with him, and stand up for them vis a vis the superiors when necessary. All of which Rathore takes care of perfectly.Lastly,  as you enjoy detailed analysis, if you have the time, you  might like to take a look at the only 2 of the kind I had done earlier, the second a month ago. These were1)No. 15 ; about the swimming pool murder (at  http://www.india-forums.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=3220402 2) No.16, the case of the dead stockbroker  (at http://www.india-forums.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=3229686). I would welcome your comments. Shyamala Aunty
I will go through the above provided links of analyzation as soon as possible. I am too glad that you agree with me on the Rathore matter. And till now I cannot get that why am I so interested in this crime-thriller show Arjun. I havenot thought with so much depth as you did, but I am just amazed to know and make out the relationships and their different types of mentalities being in same relationship, as showcased in the mute-evidence case and stock-broker murder case. And even in Honour killing episode, set in the backdrop of Rajputana customs. The mother killed her daughter ruthlessly only to protect herself from dishonour in her community. Motherly affections were blown away by stigma of shame. A very cruel side of human nature was reflected because of the haunting of disgrace. This show has visualised three avatars of mothers. After going through your column I think maybe the same things worked out for me. To be honest, the pair ArHea and Shaleen are also the reason till an extent. But, the truth is that the show had already attracted me before the pair and Shaleen could affect me. So, I must agree that this show has something in it which has gripped me badly, and that was sorrowfully beyond my knowledge. And now I strongly believe the points you marked out are the reasons behind my liking for the show. And I will request you to pen down an analysation for every episode if possible. Because its always my pleasure to hear from you. Thanks.

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sashashyam

_TaNi_

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Joined: 24 November 2011

Posts: 18104

Posted: 06 November 2012 at 9:44am | IP Logged
Originally posted by sashashyam

My dear Sanchayita,

I am truly delighted and flattered by the degree of interest with which you have received my post, and I am sure you are going to have a lot of fun looking out for the finer points in many of the future Arjun episodes.

Beside this  aspect, you know, after watching a dozen of them, what struck me was the dark side of life and relationships that the series often brings out, going beyond the usual greed or jealousy.

The exchange murders  episode (No.9). about a rich businessman and a waiter who commit each other's murders,  was relatively straightforward and clearly based on the Hitchcock classic film Strangers on a Train.

But there was also a dishonourable love that clashes with the normal protectiveness of maternal love, as in the dead stockbroker story, where the mother's apparent readiness to let her own daughter be accused of the murder she had committed was so shocking. It was a similar clash in the case of the mute witness, the boy who idolizes Eagleman, only there it is the opposite, for the mother is ready  to assume the guilt for what her son has done, for she holds herself morally  responsible for it. In both cases, the immoral behaviour of the mother ruins a whole family.

The shocking kinnara human sacrifice story is also rooted in a terrible alienation from society, and in the murder by peanuts (No.3), it is revenge for the unbearable loss of a beloved sister. No wonder Arjun, whose own life has been twisted beyond repair by a brutal criminal, empathises with the younger sister, even if she has murdered two persons in cold blood.

It is in this plumbing of the dark corners of the human psyche that Arjun,  for me, stands out. It is not just a gung ho, cops and robbers serial, with macho cops strutting around punching people. I hope it stays that way.

And as for Rathore, your assessment is spot on. It is absolutely not necessary to be exceptional to be regarded as a good cop. Moreover, to  be the kind of good chief that Rathore  is, what is needed is the ability to get the best out of each team member, to carry them all with him, and stand up for them vis a vis the superiors when necessary. All of which Rathore takes care of perfectly.

Lastly,  as you enjoy detailed analysis, if you have the time, you  might like to take a look at the only 2 of the kind I had done earlier, the second a month ago. These were

1)No. 15 ; about the swimming pool murder (at 

http://www.india-forums.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=3220402

2) No.16, the case of the dead stockbroker  (at http://www.india-forums.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=3229686).

I would welcome your comments.

Shyamala Aunty


I m definitely gonna go through d links 

wold luv to read ur POV as well

Purva

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sashashyam

sashashyam

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sashashyam

Joined: 04 January 2012

Posts: 7570

Posted: 06 November 2012 at 12:11pm | IP Logged
My dear Sanchayita,

I am pleased and intrigued to see that you have now identified the real reason for your liking Arjun, going beyond the largely hypothetical romance between Arjun and Riya, which is of course a non-starter now.

I wonder if you realise the great advantage this gives you over the majority of the forum, who are so deeply affected by Riya's death that they probably cannot enjoy Arjun any more. That  is a great pity, for it is a very good show of its kind and is getting better by the week. You too must be disappointed and upset by Riya's death, as I was myself, which is why I wrote a Requiem to Riya Mukherjee criticising it. But you have a clear interest in what should be the core of the series, the detection and punishment of crime. So you will be able to carry on very nicely.

I missed out on the 3rd distorted version of maternal love (or the lack of it) in episode 2, and I am glad you have flagged that too. It can be anywhere, not just in Rajasthan as shown, there are cases among NRI families too. There might well be such cases among traditional Italian families as well.

I am glad you agree with me that it is the varying motivations that are so fascinating, and it is these dark and distorted shades in the characters, as also the bright and reassuring ones,  that make them seem real, and not like cardboard cut-outs.

I have got a bit delayed with my take on both of this week's episodes, but I hope to get it out tomorrow. Meanwhile, think about Arjun's main  motivation for chasing down Hiten Saxena so relentlessly. It is not just a passion for fighting crime, or an inbuilt bulldog tenacity. I think it is really because he feels very guilty that after Roshni, and then Riya,  Sandhya is the third woman whose life he has failed to save in a crisis. It is not really his fault, for Sandhya dies within hours of talking to him at the party, but that is what he says to the rest of the team  Main uske liye kuch bhi nahin kar saka.  He wants to be free of this awful burden of guilt, and that is why, in the end, he walks off with a light tread.

More later.

Shyamala Aunty

Originally posted by SanchayitaM



 ] I will go through the above provided links of analyzation as soon as possible. I am too glad that you agree with me on the Rathore matter.

And till now I cannot get that why am I so interested in this crime-thriller show Arjun. I havenot thought with so much depth as you did, but I am just amazed to know and make out the relationships and their different types of mentalities being in same relationship, as showcased in the mute-evidence case and stock-broker murder case. And even in Honour killing episode, set in the backdrop of Rajputana customs. The mother killed her daughter ruthlessly only to protect herself from dishonour in her community. Motherly affections were blown away by stigma of shame. A very cruel side of human nature was reflected because of the haunting of disgrace. This show has visualised three avatars of mothers. After going through your column I think maybe the same things worked out for me.

To be honest, the pair ArHea and Shaleen are also the reason till an extent. But, the truth is that the show had already attracted me before the pair and Shaleen could affect me. So, I must agree that this show has something in it which has gripped me badly, and that was sorrowfully beyond my knowledge.

And now I strongly believe the points you marked out are the reasons behind my liking for the show. And I will request you to pen down an analysation for every episode if possible. Because its always my pleasure to hear from you. Thanks.


Originally posted by sashashyam

My dear Sanchayita,

I am truly delighted and flattered by the degree of interest with which you have received my post, and I am sure you are going to have a lot of fun looking out for the finer points in many of the future Arjun episodes.

Beside this  aspect, you know, after watching a dozen of them, what struck me was the dark side of life and relationships that the series often brings out, going beyond the usual greed or jealousy.

The exchange murders  episode (No.9). about a rich businessman and a waiter who commit each other's murders,  was relatively straightforward and clearly based on the Hitchcock classic film Strangers on a Train.

But there was also a dishonourable love that clashes with the normal protectiveness of maternal love, as in the dead stockbroker story, where the mother's apparent readiness to let her own daughter be accused of the murder she had committed was so shocking. It was a similar clash in the case of the mute witness, the boy who idolizes Eagleman, only there it is the opposite, for the mother is ready  to assume the guilt for what her son has done, for she holds herself morally  responsible for it. In both cases, the immoral behaviour of the mother ruins a whole family.

The shocking kinnara human sacrifice story is also rooted in a terrible alienation from society, and in the murder by peanuts (No.3), it is revenge for the unbearable loss of a beloved sister. No wonder Arjun, whose own life has been twisted beyond repair by a brutal criminal, empathises with the younger sister, even if she has murdered two persons in cold blood.

It is in this plumbing of the dark corners of the human psyche that Arjun,  for me, stands out. It is not just a gung ho, cops and robbers serial, with macho cops strutting around punching people. I hope it stays that way.

And as for Rathore, your assessment is spot on. It is absolutely not necessary to be exceptional to be regarded as a good cop. Moreover, to  be the kind of good chief that Rathore  is, what is needed is the ability to get the best out of each team member, to carry them all with him, and stand up for them vis a vis the superiors when necessary. All of which Rathore takes care of perfectly.

Lastly,  as you enjoy detailed analysis, if you have the time, you  might like to take a look at the only 2 of the kind I had done earlier, the second a month ago. These were

1)No. 15 ; about the swimming pool murder (at 

http://www.india-forums.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=3220402

2) No.16, the case of the dead stockbroker  (at http://www.india-forums.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=3229686).

I would welcome your comments.

Shyamala Aunty


I

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sashashyam

IF-Rockerz

sashashyam

Joined: 04 January 2012

Posts: 7570

Posted: 06 November 2012 at 12:15pm | IP Logged
My dear Purva,

Now that is a really pretty name, and a nice change from Purvi, which is becoming rather common these days.

I shall look forward to your views on those 2 older posts, and I hope to  get the new one,  or both of the latest episodes, very soon. As I mentioned earlier, I liked your crisp take on it a lot.

Shyamala Aunty

Originally posted by tani23



I m definitely gonna go through d links 

wold luv to read ur POV as well

Purva


Originally posted by sashashyam

My dear Sanchayita,

I am truly delighted and flattered by the degree of interest with which you have received my post, and I am sure you are going to have a lot of fun looking out for the finer points in many of the future Arjun episodes.

Beside this  aspect, you know, after watching a dozen of them, what struck me was the dark side of life and relationships that the series often brings out, going beyond the usual greed or jealousy.

The exchange murders  episode (No.9). about a rich businessman and a waiter who commit each other's murders,  was relatively straightforward and clearly based on the Hitchcock classic film Strangers on a Train.

But there was also a dishonourable love that clashes with the normal protectiveness of maternal love, as in the dead stockbroker story, where the mother's apparent readiness to let her own daughter be accused of the murder she had committed was so shocking. It was a similar clash in the case of the mute witness, the boy who idolizes Eagleman, only there it is the opposite, for the mother is ready  to assume the guilt for what her son has done, for she holds herself morally  responsible for it. In both cases, the immoral behaviour of the mother ruins a whole family.

The shocking kinnara human sacrifice story is also rooted in a terrible alienation from society, and in the murder by peanuts (No.3), it is revenge for the unbearable loss of a beloved sister. No wonder Arjun, whose own life has been twisted beyond repair by a brutal criminal, empathises with the younger sister, even if she has murdered two persons in cold blood.

It is in this plumbing of the dark corners of the human psyche that Arjun,  for me, stands out. It is not just a gung ho, cops and robbers serial, with macho cops strutting around punching people. I hope it stays that way.

And as for Rathore, your assessment is spot on. It is absolutely not necessary to be exceptional to be regarded as a good cop. Moreover, to  be the kind of good chief that Rathore  is, what is needed is the ability to get the best out of each team member, to carry them all with him, and stand up for them vis a vis the superiors when necessary. All of which Rathore takes care of perfectly.

Lastly,  as you enjoy detailed analysis, if you have the time, you  might like to take a look at the only 2 of the kind I had done earlier, the second a month ago. These were

1)No. 15 ; about the swimming pool murder (at 

http://www.india-forums.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=3220402

2) No.16, the case of the dead stockbroker  (at http://www.india-forums.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=3229686).

I would welcome your comments.

Shyamala Aunty

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