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A.R.Rahman (Fan Club) (Page 92)

Sudha_rn Goldie
Sudha_rn
Sudha_rn

Joined: 22 March 2006
Posts: 1840

Posted: 19 May 2006 at 3:32am | IP Logged
Originally posted by A.S.P.I.R.E

ARR Pic Gallery

Picture Gallery Done !

New Members List on Page 14 .. Check it out and lemme know if I am missing anyone ..

Hope you all like it ... Keep adding pics ! Big smile Big smile

Swetha, i saw the Pic gallerty. It was AmazingClap


dayita Goldie
dayita
dayita

Joined: 01 May 2006
Posts: 1896

Posted: 19 May 2006 at 4:09am | IP Logged
Originally posted by dannyk

Originally posted by dayita

Originally posted by A.S.P.I.R.E

ARR Pic Gallery
Picture Gallery Done !

New Members List on Page 14 .. Check it out and lemme know if I am missing anyone ..

Hope you all like it ... Keep adding pics ! Big smile Big smile

Swetha, I didnt find any members list on Page 14Confused



do check out on the page 18 ... :)  

Thanks Danny, i got it..

dayita Goldie
dayita
dayita

Joined: 01 May 2006
Posts: 1896

Posted: 19 May 2006 at 4:12am | IP Logged
Mumbai, May 19 (IANS) Rakeysh Omprakash Mehra, who is just back from the US after screening "Rang De Basanti" in various universities, says students there associated the film with racial discrimination and apartheid.

"I sensed the same passion, the will to change the status quo, in the audiences in the US," Mehra told IANS in an interview. "Everyone seemed to identify with the theme of corruption in politics and also the Hindu-Muslim conflict..."

He is aware that with the success of the film, he has a much larger audience than he did after his debut film "Aks". "However, I won't make a 'youth' film next time just to connect with the target audience," Mehra said.

Excerpts:

You took "Rang De Basanti" on this historic trip through the academia in the US?

Historic? That sounds too self-important. But, yes, we did go through the liberal mid-west area of the US. There were two shows also by Global Rhythm where A.R. Rahman performed. They were awesome. Rahman was accompanied by a 150-piece orchestra and a full choir.

The trip served as a curtain raiser. After the shows I've a feeling that a lot more invitations are on the way. Stanford, New York Universities..."Rang De Basanti" has established its own network all across the world.

Did the students at the US universities understand the indigenous historical references?

I was apprehensive whether they'd cotton on. But the US students identified with the film to the hilt. I saw no difference between the reactions in Ahmedabad and Cincinnati. I sensed the same passion, the will to change the status quo, in the audiences in the US. I didn't feel the cultural disparity at all. They associated the political situation in the film with racial discrimination and apartheid. They spoke to me about how the poor in the US couldn't avail of medical benefits.

I think "Rang De Basanti" is being seen as a parable on corruption and discrimination. The US students told me how the image of America as a cultural melting pot has gone for a toss. Everyone seemed to identify with the theme of corruption in politics and also the Hindu-Muslim conflict as represented by the characters played by Atul Kulkarni and Kunal Kohli. A couple of years ago after 9/11 the Americans too had started being suspicious of Muslims. They could empathise with Atul's reformation from radical to tolerant Hindu.

What has the impact of "Rang De Basanti" taught you about the influence and power of cinema?

Yes, that's a question I've been waiting to answer. It's difficult to say something on this without sounding pompous. I had heard about the power of cinema. I had experienced it as a member of the audience. But while making "Rang De Basanti", I never thought it was going to connect so deeply and so widely.

After you make a film you see it making such an impact all over the people, you suddenly understand how completely an audiences can love a film, give themselves completely to the cinematic medium. I know one thing for sure. Once you make a film and it goes into the theatres, it's no longer your property.

But how could American audiences connect with Indian history?

The American audiences have adopted "Rang De Basanti" and are willing to learn about Indian history. I didn't know about Che Guevara until I saw Walter Salles' "Motorcycle Diaries". I truly believe cinema is one of the most powerful mediums of expression. I saw people enthralled by my film and then watched them discussing it as an experience that takes cinema beyond all prescriptions of entertainment and information. Only cinema can do this.

So far we thought our youth don't think beyond sports shoes and sneakers. The market research and entire tools of advertising have been proven wrong. We totally misread the youth. The things that touch and move you will always triumph in cinema. And we don't need to stick to the time-tested formula of boy-girl, father-son, romance drama etc to get the audience interested. The lesson from "Rang De Basanti" is so simple. If you can touch the audiences' heart, you can win them over. That's the only magic formula we filmmakers should know.

"Rang De..." seems to have struck a chord with the youth.

I'm told viewers between the age of 16 and 35 constitute 65 percent of the audience for our movies. It doesn't require brains to know that a film should appeal to that age group. However, I won't make a 'youth' film next time just to connect with the target audience. I'll do exactly what the plot dictates.

What next?

We're working on a script called "Delhi - 6" about my childhood in Chandni Chowk. We'll see how it goes. I've started work on it. I don't even have time to sleep. In a month I'll know if the screenplay is going where I want it to.

Would you work with the same crew as "Rang De Basanti" again?

Of course, why not? We know the level of work that we accept from all of us. Why shouldn't we carry on together? I'm aware I've a much larger audience this time than I had after my first film "Aks". I can't run away from that truth. But I can only do what comes naturally to me.

Today Rakeysh Mehra is a brand name.

And I thought I had left the whole experience of advertising behind me. Ha!
dayita Goldie
dayita
dayita

Joined: 01 May 2006
Posts: 1896

Posted: 19 May 2006 at 4:14am | IP Logged
Hi members I am going crazy...we are very close to the 100th page now..are you ready for the celebration????? Smile
dayita Goldie
dayita
dayita

Joined: 01 May 2006
Posts: 1896

Posted: 19 May 2006 at 4:17am | IP Logged

the people who made a difference


India Today featured "1994: the people who made a difference." Rahman was the featured one in the music department. Here is the article on him... ( Rahman watchers note the Govind Nihalani part)

For close to two decades, Tamil Pop and film scores meant mostly Ilaiyaraaja. It was easy, he never really had any competition. Till a 25-year old who prefers untrained voices to silky smooth renditions and breathing space between beats to typical many-layered, cramped orchestration came along. Now, two years later, A.R.Rahman looks like he is here to stay, with his digitalised sound based on pop-rock and reggae and fused with traditional Indian-mainly Carnatic-folk idioms. The supreme irony: he used to play keyboards in Ilaiyaraja's orchestra. Says Gangai Amaran, a music director and Ilaiyaraja's brother:"Rahman's music is of the computer age. It is digital, but intelligent, not just noise. He concentrates on his melody and has not deviated totally from Carnatic traditions." What he has done, though, is deviated totally from the norm and rung up hit score after hit track, moving near effortlessly from the Tamil scene to take over Hindi film music. And spawned on the way a whole new approach that is finding imitators countrywide. Even before the Hindi version of director Mani Ratnam's Tamil film Roja hit the screens last year - in a way, Rahman can be a called a Ratnam discovery, spotted by him as a promising composer even against the backdrop of Ilaiyaraja's elaborate orchestration - the sound track and songs were churning cash registers. They helped sell over 25 lakh tapes. Bollywood director Subhash Ghai has replaced Laxmikant-Pyarelal with Rahman for his next project, and pre-release has sold the sound track for a figure of Rs.1 crore, very respectable by industry standards. Art film maestro Govind Nihalani has also signed him on. And Ratnam has banked on Rahman's earlier magic with Roja to sell the sound track for his soon to be released Bombay for Rs.80 lakh. Rahman, a former jingle composer, works to exacting standards of quality, but is also an inveterate risk-taker. For Roja, he used the quavering voices of old women to great effect, and for the now famous title track, the non-filmi, pop voices of Baba Sehgal and Shweta Shetty. For Chikkubukku raile, a Tamil hit song, he banked on an unknown voice, its lisp and anglicised delivery. Rahman likes working with untrained voices, saying a slight "defect in the singing adds a human touch." A workable quirk? Typically, critics say that like other music trends, Rahman and his mood music will also fade away. He hopes to delay that by changing and offering new sounds, and staying relatively exclusive by accepting no more than five film projects a year. The fact is that it could take a Rahman to replace a Rahman. Few are likely to complain.

http://www.pvv.ntnu.no/~kailasan/articles/the%20people%20who %20made%20a%20difference.htm

dayita Goldie
dayita
dayita

Joined: 01 May 2006
Posts: 1896

Posted: 19 May 2006 at 4:19am | IP Logged

hamara rahman

This is a news article on Rahman that appeared as an editorial in Times of India Dated 1st July 1995.

Tamil music director A.R. Rahman has scored the music for his first Hindi film and inadvertently sounded a high C for the melodious rhtyhm of the fusion music he has created -- with chart-topping, nation-wide success -- only for south-of-the-Vindhyas cine ventures so far. Hindi music aficionados might well rejoice that Rahman in the original will henceforth be available; no longer will there be need for the tortuous transmutation that his Tamil film songs underwent to reach audiences that waxed lyrical over Roja's "Choti si asha", and Bombay's "Hamma Hamma". But this change might have more currency than that. For, Rahman's trumpeted, indeed yearned for, entry into Bollywood may have done more to orchestrate the diverse strains of north-south celluloid culture into a tuneful symphony that can be imagined. To use the geographical cliche by which Indian school children learn their country's extremes, when people from Kashmir to Kanyakumari sway alike to say, Kaadalan's "Muqabala", albeit in different toungues, there is unity-in-diversity indeed. Only thus, of course, could Rahman's arrival on the Bombay film scene have been possible. It bears noting that Ilayaraaja, whose music also used to be variously copied by Bombay's re-mix rajas (because it was a refreshingly dissimilar) can hardly be said to have achieved the north-south harmony Rahman has. But even if the song and dance over Rahman's Hindi film debut seems a trifle overdone it might at least help focus on a more discordant matter. The 28-year old is quite easily the most imitated man of music in India -- seven clones at last count of the song "Muqabala" but once his original renditions emanate directly from Bollywood, even more brazen of his imitators might conceivably choose caution over capricious copying. That said, it may be noted that the Hindi film industry is notoriously unfetterd when it comes to frank plagiarism of any theme, storyline, melody or lyric that it chances upon anywhere in the world and fancies. Our disregard for intellectual property rights or more simply, the right a creative person has to maintaining the singular attributes of his work, may accord well with our outrage over process patenting that the west is hell-bent upon, but at least the legislative restraint on blatant copyright violation is now in place, even if belatedly. In May, an amendment was incorporated in the copyright act prohibiting version recordings for two years after the original hits the charts. But for all the legislative discouragement, the culture of unapologetic imitativeness may still flourish for there is little one can do when we, as a people, are nonchalantly accepting of such creative kleptomania. Rahman of course, has thrown up his hands at the gimcrack imitations he sees of his creations. As he stays unruffled by the copyists, or indeed a super stardom undreamed of when the eleven-year old played a keyboard to earn his living, the nation could do worse than swing to his fusion-anthem of change.

http://www.pvv.ntnu.no/~kailasan/articles/hamara%20rahman.ht m

dayita Goldie
dayita
dayita

Joined: 01 May 2006
Posts: 1896

Posted: 19 May 2006 at 4:21am | IP Logged

rahman roar!


Report appeared on The Straits Times, Singapore. BY S GULAM Nov 4, 1996/ Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Saturday Night Fever- Indian-style - at the Shah Alam Stadium. And the man turning up the heat was the King of Indian Pop, A R Rahman. He rocked the 80,000-seat stadium with 180 minutes of non-stop music and songs from all his hit movies. About 30,000 fans paid between RM$50 (S$20) and RM$1,000 to watch the musical wonderboy perform his first-ever "live" concert. And they created a roar which would have given any soccer match a run for its money. The night began with a countdown by the world-renowned drummer Subramani. It ended with the baby-faced Rahman taunting the crowd to plead for more...if it didn't want him to call it a day. It did. And Rahman, 27, fulfilled the request with his own favourite song, "Mustafa, Mustafa". Thousands of fans, including saree-clad women - young and middle-aged, got up and danced on the terrace. Rahman was, without doubt, the star attraction of the night that also featured other Indian artistes. He not only played the keyboard and the piano, he also sang and danced, bringing the crowd to its feet often.

High praise
His performance drew a fitting compliment from Rishi Kapoor, the chief guest for the night. Said the top Hindi movie star and son of the late Raj Kapoor: "A R Rahman, is, without doubt, the most talented musician in India." Tamil poet Vairamuthu said: "There are two Rs which rule Tamil Nadu today. One is superstar Rajinikanth. The other is A R Rahman." Rahman kept his promise and delivered one of the best Indian concerts ever.

http://www.pvv.ntnu.no/~kailasan/articles/rahman%20roar.htm

dayita Goldie
dayita
dayita

Joined: 01 May 2006
Posts: 1896

Posted: 19 May 2006 at 4:23am | IP Logged

set me free


Controversy: A war erupts between A.R.Rahman and Magnasound (Oct 96)

What's happening at Magnasound? Set Me Free, the English pop album which recently flooded the market, was originally released six years ago. At that time, the credits read... music composed by A.S. Dulip Kumar and rendered by Shubhaa. Not surprisingly the album found no takers. Then Roja came along. The little-known jingle composer A.S.Dulip Kumar became music director A. R. Rahman. Shrewd business minds at Magnasound lost no time in printing brand new cassette-wrappers with Rahman's name and face prominently displayed on the front flap... and announced the release of the first international album by the whiz kid. Huge hoardings sprung up all over Chennai city, publicising the new album... obviously in a bid to capitalise on Rahman's current popularity. Madhav Das, the executive director of Magnasound, didn't even feel the need to confer with A.R.Rahman before releasing the album. "Why should I ask Rahman about re-releasing an old album with a new name? After all Rahman too changed his name without asking anyone, didn't he?" says Das. On the other hand, Rahman is livid. "I'm not ashamed of my old album. Neither am I trying to hide my past," explained the music director. But he wants the public to know that Set Me Free is a six-year-old album which was done as an experimental venture with singer Shubhaa. Magnasound, he feels, is wrong in trying to pass it off as a brand-new album. When Set Me Free, the album that has stirred up a hornet's nest, was released way back in 1991, only 8,000 copies of the cassette were sold. According to Magnasound, it's because people weren't ready for that kind of music yet. Today anything with the name Rahman can turn to gold... which is why Magnasound has evidently flooded the market with 20,000 cassettes of an album that was once a non-starter. Set Me Free re-appeared on the store counters on September 26, this year. Within 48 hours, stocks were sold out throughout the city. Spurred by the response, Madhav Das has decided to go for the kill. Zee TV, Star Plus and all other satellite channels will advertise a 'new' pop album from A.R. Rahman. "I'm positive I will be able to sell at least two lakh cassettes," Das claims. "I'm also not guilty of cheating either the public or Rahman because I have the legal rights to exploit this album. And make it a super-duper HIT."

http://www.pvv.ntnu.no/~kailasan/articles/set%20me%20free.ht m

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