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Prostitution is LEGAL or ILLEGAL?? (Page 8)

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Vinzy

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Vinzy

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Posted: 06 November 2007 at 11:23am | IP Logged
ooops my one year old topic LOL

@Qwarty:..you mean entertainment Tax??!!!! LOL So they expect Pension too Wink

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IdeaQueen

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Posted: 06 November 2007 at 11:23am | IP Logged
Originally posted by qwertyesque

Btw, I would just want enough legality to prevent treating them in an inhuman manner.. for eg...police think they are a uncultured door mats of a cultured society..so can be treated in anyway way conducive to themselves,  criminals think since the society doesnt support them they can have their way with these hapless creatures.....

Our govt would prefer begging from WB than getting revenue by taxing them anyways.... harrrraaaam ki kamai hui na woh......LOL


WellsaidClapClapClap

qwertyesque

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Posted: 06 November 2007 at 12:30pm | IP Logged

Originally posted by Believe

ooops my one year old topic LOL

@Qwarty:..you mean entertainment Tax??!!!! LOL So they expect Pension too Wink

sure when just start doing public performances... last i heard everyhings is still in enclosed surroundings...LOL.. believe you believe a lot of progressive things i would say...LOL

main toh kewal income tax di gal kardaa...

IdeaQueen

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Posted: 06 November 2007 at 6:52pm | IP Logged

Helping women make choices on prostitution

Leslie Cannold
October 1, 2007

SEX work is back in the news. Having hardly been broached in polite conversation since the State Government's "tolerance zone" policy for street sex work went down in flames five years ago, the West Australian Government's decision to decriminalise and regulate indoor prostitution has refocused minds around the country on the best way to manage the oldest profession.

As a feminist academic and long-time St Kilda resident, I've been thinking about these issues for a long time. Only recently, however, have I arrived at what I think is a fair and sensible approach, one that recognises women as moral agents capable of accepting both the rights and responsibilities associated with selling sex.

It looks like this. Advocates and opponents of decriminalisation adopt extreme characterisations of women to justify their positions. On one side are the decriminalisation advocates self-proclaimed unions or advocacy groups for prostitutes who contend that sex work is a job like any other, that women have a right to perform this "work" whenever and wherever they like and that society is obliged to regulate to protect sex-sellers from the risks associated with having serial sex with unknown men.

In the opposing corner are the radical feminists and members of the religious right. For this unholy alliance, prostitution is always a violent and exploitative encounter that, by definition, no competent woman would ever choose to participate in. As two Norwegian scientists put it, "no one wants to rent out her vagina as a garbage can for hordes of anonymous men's ejaculations". Dismissing with an imperious hand-wave the claims of some prostitutes that they freely choose to sell their bodies, real and pseudo radical feminists and religious wowsers persist in describing all sex-sellers as victims whom they must protect by enforcing no-tolerance policies.

The victim approach to managing street prostitution is objectionable on a number of grounds. These include its obnoxious paternalism and the disingenuous way in which political agitation designed to impose the agitator's view of what is best on everyone else is dressed up as selfless "feminist" advocacy on behalf of women. But most offensive is the way in which the argument itself victimises sex-sellers by denying their experience and stripping them of their agency.

Abandoning the all-or-nothing approach and recognising the indisputable fact that some women do choose to sell sex, while others don't, incarnates a realistic and fair approach for the management of indoor and outdoor sex in liberal democracies. A position where sex-sellers are moral agents worthy of respect instead of pitiable victims in need of paternalistic protection who have rights and responsibilities on how they ply their trade. Competent adult women (and men) should be free to sell their bodies, however strongly some in the community object. However, like other choosers, when the consequences of the selling choice restricts the capacity of fellow citizens to exercise their freedoms, the state is obligated to restrict their activity.

A focus on autonomous choice also justifies state intervention where sex workers lack the capacity because they are too young, mentally ill, sexually or physically abused or drug addicted to make choices about selling sex.

What this cashes out to are policies that decriminalise and constructively regulate indoor prostitution and prohibit street solicitation and sex. Behind this approach is a rebuttable presumption that adult women who sell sex are autonomous and that communities affected by street sex suffer an unjustified loss of amenity and security. Such policies address the real potential for exploitation and coercion in the sex trade by offering sex-sellers opportunities to exit, such as income support, places in drug rehabilitation programs and police intervention in violent relationships at regular intervals at their "workplaces" and each time they have contact with the law. The availability of such programs to women working indoors should give us confidence that sellers are choosing this way of life, while offering street prostitutes when combined with fines and jail terms for punters a real opportunity to either move inside or to exit the trade.

Women who are truly moral agents must accept both the rights and responsibilities that accompany their choices. I think it vital that public language and policy concerning women particularly as sexual and reproductive beings validate us as citizens capable of both making choices and living with their consequences. Autonomous adult women have a right to sell provided they go about it in ways that don't unfairly burden the community of which they are a part, though as a community we have a positive obligation to ensure that at every stage of what is potentially a violent, exploitative and coercive game, a woman's freedom to say "no" is protected.

This is why allowing brothels to operate in a regulated fashion is a good idea, but street sex work can never be tolerated. Not just because a disproportionate number of street prostitutes are too young, too drug-addicted, too psychologically scarred or cowed by violence or abuse to make an autonomous choice to sell themselves, but because the cost to the community of their behaviour, even if theirs is a choice worthy of the name, is far too high.

http://www.theage.com.au/news/opinion/helping-women-make-cho ices-on-prostitution/2007/09/30/1191090938867.html?page=2



Edited by mythili_Kiran - 06 November 2007 at 6:53pm

joie de vivre

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Posted: 07 November 2007 at 10:18pm | IP Logged

Originally posted by mythili_Kiran


The legalization of the services of prostitutes will bring much more trauma to the women...particulary to the poor people....and some girls will not hesitate doing part time jobs as it would not be any more illegalSmile

The uneducated poor girls would NEVER be able to understand what legalisation is,hence irrespective of whether prostitution is legalised or not,these girls would be knee deep in the mess....The legalisation would only do them good,it'd improve their conditions of work AND provide them proper health care

The educated poor girls...They belong to the ilk who get into prostitution because their family is in dire straits(a la Rani Mukherjee in Laaga Chunari Mein Daag  though that film was yet another presumptuous and overweening account of the hardships of a hookerDead)..Now these girls can comprehend and suss out the laws,check whether the laws are being adhered to and if otherwise, these girls can stand up for their rights....

 

Originally posted by Mythili_Kiran


No one hates the prostitutes but the work of prostitution is not encourage able..

I wouldn't be too sure about thatOuch...Everything said and done,prostitution is NOT a respectable profession... ...Admittedly,I do take pity on those who were coerced into it,but I'm afraid I cannot say that my perception of the sex-workers isn't imbued with a whit of disgust or contempt ...If for instance one of my best mates turned out to be a sex-worker,I can NEVER see him/her in the same light again.....Ouch

Originally posted by nitasuni

I am against leagalising this profession, but not against giving some help to the well being of these.

By "help",are you referring to charity??..Because that isn't of any help,seeing as they get into this ignominious profession for money....Or are you referring to the improvisation of their living(which encompasses everything from health care,to preventing their exploitation)??...In that is the kind of "help" you're wanting to offer them,then legalisation of the profession would take care of itSmile

 



Edited by joie de vivre - 07 November 2007 at 10:19pm

Vinzy

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Posted: 07 November 2007 at 10:26pm | IP Logged
Originally posted by qwertyesque

Originally posted by Believe

ooops my one year old topic LOL

@Qwarty:..you mean entertainment Tax??!!!! LOL So they expect Pension too Wink

sure when just start doing public performances... last i heard everyhings is still in enclosed surroundings...LOL.. believe you believe a lot of progressive things i would say...LOL--thanx yaarWink...always keep chote chote thoughts....jaada soch kar novel likhne ki time nahe.....LOLWink

main toh kewal income tax di gal kardaa...

Entertainment tax is part of Income tax......Big smile sometime i feel Actuly they doing service to Needy n Greedy peoples...EmbarrassedSmile

 

nitasuni

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Posted: 07 November 2007 at 11:42pm | IP Logged
Originally posted by joie de vivre

[

Originally posted by nitasuni

I am against leagalising this profession, but not against giving some help to the well being of these.

By "help",are you referring to charity??..Because that isn't of any help,seeing as they get into this ignominious profession for money....Or are you referring to the improvisation of their living(which encompasses everything from health care,to preventing their exploitation)??...In that is the kind of "help" you're wanting to offer them,then legalisation of the profession would take care of itSmile

No I am not referring about charity. Treat them with compassion. People who are willing to help can do a lot by joing  with the  NGOs. In kerala one of the Municipalities helped the less educated sex-workers by giving jobs in cleaning, collecting, selecting and desposing garbages and in laundry etc. Only one of the group didn't joind this becuase of the hatered to her husband who lead her to this. They are willing to do these jobs to get back in to the main steream of the society.

Whatever we may said, a lots of well educated girls are geting into this traps by means of offering better job in and abroad,   and in cenema field and serial field.(Informations from tv channels, news papers Women's magazines).The adveritsements are made in prominent news papers, interviews are conducted. Can help these girls by giving proper education.

As said in a film"Gundas are not made by a Gunda father and Gundamother". Circumstances are making this.  Please don't leagalise , because even now a days, even when the girls are innocent, they got the punishment the counter -parts will get away easily and get married and live happily, If leagalised., the girls will be   peanalised more. 

Can help girls from the trap  by giving proper guidence.

Please treat the less fortunate with some compassion.

qwertyesque wrote:

Our govt would prefer begging from WB than getting revenue by taxing them anyways.... harrrraaaam ki kamai hui na woh......LOL

 You mean to take money from  beggers plates



Edited by nitasuni - 08 November 2007 at 1:44am

joie de vivre

Goldie

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Joined: 18 January 2007

Posts: 1239

Posted: 08 November 2007 at 1:32am | IP Logged

Originally posted by nitasuni

No I am not referring about charity. Treat them with compassion. People who are willing to help can do a lot by joing  with the  NGOs.  They are willing to do these jobs to get back in to the main steream of the society.

Here you're talking about those who unwillingly get into prostitution...The ones who were tricked into this profession,who want to escape from the lowly life they are doomed to....But legalisation will put paid to the pImps(and thereby child abuse and exploitation),trafficking of unwilling reluctant girls and also forced entry into the field of prostitution....Innocent and uneducted girls wouldn't be forcibly pushed into prostituion,their money wouldn't be snatched away leaving them to cope with the terrible ramifications...

Agreed that legalisation doesn't connote that all the laws would be strictly adhered to,but atleast there would be a definite improvement..We speak from a third person's POV,but for a moment,if we put ourselves in their shoes,we'd understand that having a few laws which protect our rights and prevent our exploitation would indeed be a welcome luxury

 

Originally posted by nitasuni

Whatever we may said, a lots of well educated girls are geting into this traps by means of offering better job in and abroad,.Can help these girls by giving propers education.

I'm sorry,but the aforementioned statements are completely contradictory.....How can "well-educated" girls by further given any "proper education"Confused

Originally posted by nitasuni

Even when the girls are innocent, they got the punishment the counter -parts will get away easily and get married and live happily, If leagalised., the girls will be peanalised more

I beg to differ.If legalised,bills can be passed which protect the identity of the sex-workers so that in future,if they wish to pursue a different career,the past wouldn't plague them...



Edited by joie de vivre - 08 November 2007 at 1:33am

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